ArchitectureWeek
 
In an Urban Context - 01
In an Urban Context

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EVOLVING THE SOLAR HOUSE

By the end of the 1970s, a significant discourse emerged about the solar house's aesthetic problems and potentials. In numerous cases, solar architecture was treated as a historically emergent type with a secure and inevitable future. One example from 1978: — Published 2013.0605

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B.C. APARTMENTS

In both the emergence and ensuing development of a modern architectural idiom in Canada's Pacific Northwest, designs for the detached family home have served an important role as crucibles of exploration and research.

New materials and building technologies have been allied with challenges to conventional social habit, while the rugged terrain, lush vegetation, and benign climate have provided a profound measure to the artifice of design. — Published 2013.0605

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

To the Editor,

I agree that there are many myths circulating today about the U.S. timber system. — Published 2013.0515

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DESIGNING THE CREATIVE CHILD

At the same time that middle-class children gained space in the general living areas of the family house and their bedrooms were decorated to enhance self-esteem and creativity, they also acquired their own miniature dwellings. — Published 2013.0515

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BIRD-FRIENDLY DESIGN - PART TWO: PROBLEMS WITH GLASS

Glass can be perceived differently depending on a number of factors, including how it is fabricated, the angle at which it is viewed, and the difference between exterior and interior light levels.

Combinations of these factors can cause it to look like a mirror or dark passageway, or to be completely invisible. Humans do not actually "see" most glass, but are cued by context such as mullions, roofs or doors. — Published 2013.0515

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HOPKINS AT NORWICH

In the fourteen years between 1995 and 2009, Hopkins Architects were responsible for the design and realization of the largest building project that Norwich Cathedral had seen since the Middle Ages. — Published 2013.0515

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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— Published 2013.0424

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STAYING PUT IN STYLE: EXPANDING WITHOUT ADDING

Sometimes the way the existing space in your home is laid out makes it difficult to use or appreciate its overall dimensions.

In a 1980s addition to a classic early-19th-century Federalist-style home, a layer of living space was simply wrapped around the perimeter of the existing home’s backside, with doorways cut through the original outside walls. — Published 2013.0424

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LABROUSTE BROUGHT TO LIGHT

Henri Labrouste is not exactly a household name, even in most architects' households. But an exhibit at New York's Museum of Modern Art through June 24 should help change that.

The French architect (1801-1875) was educated at the French Academy in Rome, trained in classical architecture, and spent his early career in Paris designing public spectacles, such as the return of Napoleon's ashes to the capital in 1841. Labrouste even designed a tomb for Bonaparte's remains. — Published 2013.0424

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MAYBECK'S SENGER HOUSE

"Ring in the love of truth and right [...] Ring in the thousand years of peace" —"In Memoriam"

These lines, by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, are inscribed into the Senger House's baronially scaled fireplace and set the mood for this remarkable dwelling. Medieval Teutonic imagery is stenciled throughout the house and carved into overscaled architectural woodwork — a Maybeckian evocation of his client, a professor of German at the nearby University of California. — Published 2013.0327

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In an Urban Context

 


 
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