ArchitectureWeek
 
In a Suburban Context - 01
In a Suburban Context

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MAYBECK'S SENGER HOUSE

"Ring in the love of truth and right [...] Ring in the thousand years of peace" —"In Memoriam"

These lines, by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, are inscribed into the Senger House's baronially scaled fireplace and set the mood for this remarkable dwelling. Medieval Teutonic imagery is stenciled throughout the house and carved into overscaled architectural woodwork — a Maybeckian evocation of his client, a professor of German at the nearby University of California. — Published 2013.0327

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THE STORY OF WEMBLEY STADIUM

The original Empire Stadium at Wembley was one of the wonders of its age. The focal point of the 1924 British Empire Exhibition, it was designed by Sir John Simpson and Maxwell Ayrton and engineered by Sir Owen Williams. — Published 2013.0327

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ESPACE JACQMOTTE - MIXED USE IN BRUSSELS

When architect Michel Jaspers discovered this full city block, which had been left vacant for decades and fallen into disrepair, he conceived to transform it into what the Espace Jacqmotte is today: probably the first large-scale mixed-use complex in the heart of the city. The aim was to provide a mix of functions, thereby fulfilling the needs of various different occupants and visitors. — Published 2013.0109

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RENOVATING FAY JONES

While the work of a master painter or sculptor might be nurtured in climate-controlled galleries for centuries, the works of master architects are often lived in, worked in, enjoyed by crowds, exposed to the weather, and vulnerable to owners' whims. Architecture lovers can hope that their favorite structures are cared for by conscientious stewards, but aside from the use of preservation easements, there are few real guarantees. — Published 2012.0523

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HOKI MUSEUM BY NIKKEN SEKKEI

When we are astonished by a building, it is often because we don't fully understand it. In such a case, we strive to close the gap between what we see and what we already know of architecture. — Published 2012.0425

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CREATIVE CONCRETE

When we think of sustainability, images of solar panels, thick insulation, and rainwater cisterns might come to mind. But Canadian architect and researcher Mark West is rethinking the bones of concrete structures to find ways to make them as efficient as possible.

West is director of the University of Manitoba's Centre for Architectural Structures and Technology (CAST), where the research revolves around fabric-formed concrete. The process uses pliable fabric to make innovative, efficient structural shapes. — Published 2012.0328

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CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM - SAFDIE IN ARKANSAS

For those familiar with the remote and quiet beauty of the Ozarks of Northwest Arkansas, the sudden appearance of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville seems somewhat miraculous. — Published 2012.0201

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HIGH-RISE SUSTAINABILITY

A high-level assessment of the impact of the urban tower on the natural environment would conclude that low land use and possible higher density are the chief advantages, with high energy usage being the chief disadvantage. Concepts of density and of energy usage are relative, and should be examined by comparing high-rise buildings with their low- or mid-rise alternatives. — Published 2012.0104

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THE STORY OF SAARINEN'S JOHN DEERE HEADQUARTERS

Carefully tucking away "the car's fat shine" was integral to the definitive Deere & Company Administrative Center in Moline, Illinois, later renamed Deere & Company World Headquarters.

The exemplar for all subsequent corporate estates, it brought together landscape, site plan, and architecture into an elegant and commanding solution. Deere definitively proved the corporate value of the high-image, high-style suburban headquarters. — Published 2011.1207

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AMERICAN LANDSCAPE AWARDS

When it originally opened in 1978, the Portland Transit Mall created a transit-focused corridor in downtown Portland, Oregon. For a distance of 11 blocks through the commercial core, a pair of one-way streets combined dedicated bus lanes and limited car traffic with wide brick sidewalks and an abundance of trees, benches, and shelters. But despite being an icon for progressive urban planning, the mall suffered deferred maintenance and deterioration over time. — Published 2011.1102

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In a Suburban Context

 


 
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