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Roman Architecture - 01
Roman Architecture

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HOPKINS AT NORWICH

In the fourteen years between 1995 and 2009, Hopkins Architects were responsible for the design and realization of the largest building project that Norwich Cathedral had seen since the Middle Ages. — Published 2013.0515

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LABROUSTE BROUGHT TO LIGHT

Henri Labrouste is not exactly a household name, even in most architects' households. But an exhibit at New York's Museum of Modern Art through June 24 should help change that.

The French architect (1801-1875) was educated at the French Academy in Rome, trained in classical architecture, and spent his early career in Paris designing public spectacles, such as the return of Napoleon's ashes to the capital in 1841. Labrouste even designed a tomb for Bonaparte's remains. — Published 2013.0424

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HOW TO TILE A EUROBATH

One aspect of civilization that the Romans got right was the tiled bath. Since then, Europeans have built tiled bathrooms that present no distinction between the shower and the rest of the room.

This success of this design depends on lots of tile and a mortar substrate that slopes to a strategically placed floor drain. A lack of thresholds also makes this kind of bathroom perfect for wheelchair access. — Published 2012.0411

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BEST OF BUILD BOSTON

Build Boston, the largest regional conference and trade show for the design and construction industry in the United States, recently demonstrated again why it has earned such preeminence.

More than 14,000 architects, designers, construction and facility managers, and owners attended the 27th Build Boston conference, hosted by the Boston Society of Architects in November 2011. The trade show floor boasted some 300 vendors — up 6% over last year — who plied their products with the usual vigor. — Published 2012.0111

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PALLADIO AWARDS 2011

Hurricanes were a primary concern for Michael G. Imber Architects when the firm designed a traditionally styled home for the new Beachtown development in Galveston, Texas.

Located on the Gulf of Mexico, the vacation-home development combines New Urbanist architecture and planning with systematic fortification against the fierce storms. — Published 2011.0608

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GOTHIC KALEIDOSCOPE

The Gothic style flourished in Central Europe during the late Gothic period, with many of the most exciting innovations in vault design found in churches built in the regions of present-day Germany and the Czech Republic. — Published 2010.0203

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CAMBRIDGE PUBLIC LIBRARY

A stunning new addition has opened at the Cambridge Public Library in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Using ideas of transparency, inclusiveness, and efficiency as starting points, William Rawn Associates designed the glass-and-steel addition as a modernist foil to the original 1888 library by Van Brunt & Howe. — Published 2009.1209

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DELFT MEDIA LIBRARY

Durability through transformation. That was the architects' vision for the DOK Library Concept Center in Delft, the Netherlands.

The multimedia library occupies part of the overhauled Hoogovenpand, a 1970s mixed-use building facing a public square. Architects Liesbeth van der Pol of Dok architects (no relation) and Aat Vos of Aequo BV revitalized the gloomy building, creating the library space among existing commercial and residential functions. — Published 2009.0128

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KOLUMBA ART MUSEUM

In Cologne, Germany, a city ravaged by World War II, the Kolumba Art Museum embraces and preserves centuries of culture and pays poetic tribute to the layers of civilization unearthed on its site. Designed by reclusive Swiss architect Peter Zumthor, the museum provides a stunning exception to the city's drab urban landscape built after the war. — Published 2009.0107

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GREAT PUBLIC MARKETS

The activity of buying and selling food has shaped our cities and towns for centuries, since an urban population by nature depends on others for agricultural production. At the heart of this activity stands the public market the buildings and spaces in which vegetables, meat, and other commodities intended for human consumption are sold by diverse persons from numerous spaces or stalls, all under a common authority. — Published 2008.0709

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