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  •  A Range of Rooms in ArchWeek
  • Remodeling - 01
    Remodeling page: 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | [next]

    ArchWeek Image

    STAYING PUT IN STYLE: WRAP-AROUND REMODEL

    An 18th-century Federal farmhouse had multiple lean-to additions tacked onto it over its first 200 years. These served not so much to reach out to the landscape but to separate those within the house from it.

    In addition, plantings that were once under control began to consume not only the home's walls but also any potential for a view from the windows that actually caught a glimpse of a backyard pond. — Published 2013.0605

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    ArchWeek Image

    STAYING PUT IN STYLE: EXPANDING WITHOUT ADDING

    Sometimes the way the existing space in your home is laid out makes it difficult to use or appreciate its overall dimensions.

    In a 1980s addition to a classic early-19th-century Federalist-style home, a layer of living space was simply wrapped around the perimeter of the existing home’s backside, with doorways cut through the original outside walls. — Published 2013.0424

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    ArchWeek Image

    STAYING PUT IN STYLE: CONDO KITCHEN

    Selectively removing a nonbearing wall connects a viewless, internal kitchen to living and dining spaces. Simple, standard detailing was used to create custom cabinets at an affordable cost.

    Tall elements — range hood, refrigerator, and upper cabinets — were kept away from the opening to allow better connection. The height of the wall allows for a visual separation of whatever is on the countertop from those in the living room. — Published 2013.0306

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    ArchWeek Image

    STAYING PUT IN STYLE: OPEN-MINDED

    In a 1920s hillside upside-down house — where the living area is below the entry level — walking downstairs to get to the living room wasn’t the only aspect that was awkward.

    When you arrived at the living floor you were unceremoniously dumped into a tight vestibule measuring just six feet by four feet (1.8 meters by 1.2 meters) with three three-foot-wide (0.9-meter-wide) doorways providing access into each space. — Published 2013.0213

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    ArchWeek Image

    STAYING PUT IN STYLE: BARING ALL

    Baring All

    Most American suburban homes have more walls than people want. There are two types of walls in most homes: those that carry weight (bearing walls) and those that don't (nonbearing walls). — Published 2013.0109

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    ArchWeek Image

    NEW NORTHWEST ARCHITECTURE

    The City of Portland and Multnomah County, Oregon, have a vision: to eradicate homelessness within their jurisdictions by 2015 through providing more permanent housing and improving social support. One step toward this ambitious goal is the new Bud Clark Commons in Portland. — Published 2012.0404

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    ArchWeek Image

    THE PROJECT IS GOING DOWN...

    What will you do to save our vital project?

    You are the project manager for the most important project in the history of your firm, and you see the project heading into serious trouble. What do you do? — Published 2012.0307

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    ArchWeek Image

    STAYING PUT IN STYLE

    There are over 80 million single-family homes in the United States, and it's estimated that 18 million of these are "under water," meaning the mortgage is larger than the value of the house. Millions of families feel trapped, living a life sentence of domestic frustration in homes that do not work for them while being unable to move to solve the problems they confront on a daily basis. — Published 2012.0208

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    ArchWeek Image

    CALIFORNIA HOUSES OF GORDON DRAKE

    Over and over again, Gordon Drake declared that it was his avowed intention to design decent homes for people on minimum budgets. It is natural enough, therefore, that he will be best remembered for his small homes designed for California living.

    One kind of assessment of his work can be approached through looking at the things that he used. — Published 2011.0713

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    ArchWeek Image

    AIA HOUSING AWARDS: SINGLE-FAMILY

    In the Towerview neighborhood of Racine, Wisconsin, a strikingly modern two-story home stands apart on a lakefront site. Though its architects credit nearby Victorians as inspiration for the vivid colors highlighting its facade, the playful tone, rectilinear massing, and structurally expressive detailing seem to make more recent references — as well they might. — Published 2011.0406

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    Remodeling page: 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | [next]

     

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    Urban Infill Prefab
    Design
    Staying Put - Creating A Cook's Kitchen
    Culture
    "The Store Problem"

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