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    Architectural Products Articles - 79
    Architectural Products Articles page: [prev] | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 |

    ArchWeek Image

    WOOD IN THE LANDSCAPE: DECKS PART IV

    This article continues our five part series on deck construction. In this installment, we look at decking and stairs—installing decking to ensure its long life, bracing the structure, and constructing stringers and steps.

    Decking — Published 2000.1101

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    IN OUT OF THE RAIN AT PDX

    It's difficult enough for visitors arriving in an unfamiliar city. It's harder still if their first experience after leaving the airport is struggling to stay dry in the notoriously rainy Pacific Northwest. Now in Portland, Oregon, visitors need worry about this no more.

    The Portland International Airport (PDX) has completed an expansive new canopy covering its entire vehicle arrival area. In deference to the scanty winter daylight, this outdoor roof is covered entirely with glass. — Published 2000.1025

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    ArchWeek Image

    WOOD IN THE LANDSCAPE: DECKS PART III

    Last week, Part II of this five part series covered the fundamentals of wood deck foundations. This week our series continues with a discussion of beams and joists, how to build with them, and how to avoid common problems.

    Beams — Published 2000.1025

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    ArchWeek Image

    WOOD IN THE LANDSCAPE: DECKS PART II

    Last week, Part I of this series discussed the origins of wood decks and basic framing systems. This week our five part series continues with the fundamentals of foundations. — Published 2000.1018

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    WOOD IN THE LANDSCAPE: DECKS PART I

    "Wood brings us back to roots of our building heritage," says Seattle landscape architect Daniel Winterbottom. "The differing grains, colors, and expressions inherent in the material give wood a warm lively quality found in few other materials." — Published 2000.1011

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    ArchWeek Image

    HIGH-TECH WINDOWS COULD SAVE ENERGY

    A window is one of the most complex components in a building. It gives us light, views, fresh air, and the sun's warmth. Yet at times trying to balance these benefits works against the goals of comfort and energy savings. Having too few windows deprives workers of psychologically important vistas and increases the need for electric lighting. But too much direct sunlight can cause glare and increase the cooling load. And the delicate balance among all these factors changes throughout the day and year. — Published 2000.1004

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    FUN WITH COMPUTER-AIDED MODELING CLAY

    One hundred years ago, Spanish architect Antonio Gaudi was astonishing the world with sculpturally creative, irregular, organic forms. While others in the profession worked with straight edges, Gaudi invented his own methods for modeling parabolic arches from the catenary curve created by suspending a length of chain between two points. — Published 2000.0816

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    THE CHANGING SHAPES OF THE AXE

    Editor's Note:  The vernacular houses at the foundation of an American concept of "home" have their origins in simple constructions, where tools and materials coexisted in seemingly rustic harmony. To grasp the spirit of those archetypical structures, it helps to understand the tools that shaped them.

    For early Americans who built log houses, the axe was indispensable. The axe is one of the most fundamental woodworking tools, and in skilled hands, one of the most versatile. — Published 2000.0809

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    INSPIRED BY GAUDI, BUILT BY HAND

    Sitting in Beth and Will Hathaway's family room in Portland, Oregon, I'm amazed that there's more than a hundred tons of concrete and dirt hanging over my head. The south-facing room, the focal point of the house, is bathed in light. So much daylight filters through four floor-to-curved-ceiling windows and two skylight domes, that I can comfortably pour over a puzzling array of structural contours on a blueprint even though no electric lamps are lit and it's drizzling outside. — Published 2000.0726

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    SYSTEMS 2000 HOSTS TECHNOLOGY PANOPLY

    The biggest attention getters at this year's A/E/C SYSTEMS Show may have been the project extranet companies and CAD systems, but there were plenty of other interesting products on display. These serve the construction industry in areas as diverse as presentations, structural analysis, team communications, job site reporting, and legal documentation. — Published 2000.0628

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    Architectural Products Articles page: [prev] | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 |

     

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