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Passive House - 01
Passive House

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EVOLVING THE SOLAR HOUSE

By the end of the 1970s, a significant discourse emerged about the solar house's aesthetic problems and potentials. In numerous cases, solar architecture was treated as a historically emergent type with a secure and inevitable future. One example from 1978: — Published 2013.0605

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FOUNDATIONS OF PASSIVE HOUSE

As we discussed in a recent article, most buildings in 2050 — less than forty years from now — will likely have to get by with perhaps 10% of the carbon footprint common in the U.S. today. We know of exactly one established building standard that's been demonstrated to produce 2050-ready homes, today. And, harsh though it might sound, anything built today that is significantly less efficient than the roughly 90% energy savings achieved by Passivhaus, seems designed to be obsolete. —The Editors — Published 2013.0130

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THE PROJECT IS GOING DOWN...

What will you do to save our vital project?

You are the project manager for the most important project in the history of your firm, and you see the project heading into serious trouble. What do you do? — Published 2012.0307

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SUSTAINABLE BY BIM: TWO CASE STUDIES

This pair of case studies explores the use of building information modeling (BIM) in small-scale sustainable design projects. —Editor

Ross Street House — Published 2012.0229

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PASSIVE HOUSE DIVIDED

Passive House-certified buildings may take next to nothing to heat. But conflict between the German creators of the Passive House energy performance standard and their U.S. affiliate continues to generate energy months after it spilled into public view.

The Passivhaus Institut (PHI) of Darmstadt, Germany, severed ties with the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) of Urbana, Illinois, in an open letter released on August 17, 2011. — Published 2012.0111

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BEST OF BUILD BOSTON

Build Boston, the largest regional conference and trade show for the design and construction industry in the United States, recently demonstrated again why it has earned such preeminence.

More than 14,000 architects, designers, construction and facility managers, and owners attended the 27th Build Boston conference, hosted by the Boston Society of Architects in November 2011. The trade show floor boasted some 300 vendors — up 6% over last year — who plied their products with the usual vigor. — Published 2012.0111

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AIA HOUSING AWARDS: SINGLE-FAMILY

In the Towerview neighborhood of Racine, Wisconsin, a strikingly modern two-story home stands apart on a lakefront site. Though its architects credit nearby Victorians as inspiration for the vivid colors highlighting its facade, the playful tone, rectilinear massing, and structurally expressive detailing seem to make more recent references — as well they might. — Published 2011.0406

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MINNESOTA AIA AWARDS

The house on Bert Hodus and Donna Brogan's farm takes design cues from a farm icon. With its south facade "warped" by design, the couple's new home evokes the graceful sag of many aging 19th- and 20th-century American barns.

The Blair, Wisconsin, house is wrapped in rainscreen siding of locally harvested, rough-sawn white oak, evocative of the clients' own turn-of-the-20th-century red barn nearby. And the window and door openings are few and large. — Published 2011.0202

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POSTCARD FROM PASSIVE HOUSE PORTLAND

Dear ArchitectureWeek,

There were 345 attendees (including me) at the North American Passive House Conference in Portland, Oregon, held from November 4 to 7, 2010. Twenty-six sessions focused on all aspects of the Passive House building energy-efficiency certification system, ranging from detailed conceptual overviews led by Passivhaus cofounder Dr. Wolfgang Feist to technical sessions about specific aspects of certification in our region. — Published 2011.0119

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BUILD BOSTON 2010

The venerable Build Boston conference often provides an excellent way to take the temperature of the architecture and construction industry. This year was no different, as the conference, now in its 26th year, took on a leaner, less glitzy feel, with a smaller trade show area and fewer celebratory ballroom events. But it was clear that attendees were serious about preparing for the future: the nearly 200 workshops and seminars were extremely well attended by thousands of industry professionals. — Published 2010.1215

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