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Mixed Use Buildings - 01
Mixed Use Buildings

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ESPACE JACQMOTTE - MIXED USE IN BRUSSELS

When architect Michel Jaspers discovered this full city block, which had been left vacant for decades and fallen into disrepair, he conceived to transform it into what the Espace Jacqmotte is today: probably the first large-scale mixed-use complex in the heart of the city. The aim was to provide a mix of functions, thereby fulfilling the needs of various different occupants and visitors. — Published 2013.0109

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MASTERS PLAN FOR MABLETON

"The only viable way to accept the gift and meet the challenge of longevity is to match the dramatic transformation of the 20th century that made it possible to grow old, with an equally dramatic and fundamentally new way of being old." — Kathryn Lawler, welcoming the Lifelong Communities Charrette Team, February 2009 — Published 2012.0822

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DESIGNING THE NEIGHBORHOOD RETAIL CENTER

Developing and managing retail centers remains one of the most financially risky of all real estate categories.

In 2006, the United States had 20.22 square feet (1.88 square meters) of gross leasable area (GLA) of retail space per capita, far more than any other nation in the world. — Published 2012.0516

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BASICS - THE SKYSCRAPER TODAY

When it comes to buildings, size matters — more so today than ever before. Look up in the heart of any of the world's major cities and your eyes will likely alight upon a towering, glass-walled structure — if not literally scraping the sky, then certainly pointing in that direction. — Published 2012.0502

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NEW URBANISM NOW

David Brower Center, Berkeley, CalforniaSafeway No. 2912, Georgetown, Washington, D.C.Cambridge Public Library, Cambridge, MassachusettsSCAD Museum of Art, Savanna, GeorgiaLafitte Housing, New Orleans, LouisianaWyvernwood Mixed-Use, Los Angeles, CaliforniaTown Center, Mount Rainier, MarylandVerkykerskop Farming Town, South AfricaVision for Berrien Springs, MichiganAnd more... — Published 2012.0328

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THE PROJECT IS GOING DOWN...

What will you do to save our vital project?

You are the project manager for the most important project in the history of your firm, and you see the project heading into serious trouble. What do you do? — Published 2012.0307

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AIA NATIONAL DESIGN AWARDS

Viewed at a distance from the southwest, 8 House looks almost like a strange landform: two vegetated roofs form a massive green "V" reaching from the ground-floor roof all the way to the top of the building, nine stories above.

The logic of this mixed-use building is better understood from a bird's-eye view. In concept, the plan is a 230-meter- (750-foot-) long loop that has been twisted to form a giant, angular figure eight. — Published 2012.0215

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AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECTURE AWARDS 2011

On a tiny site measuring only seven by six meters (23 by 20 feet), a compact new home rises four and a half stories amidst the urban fabric of Surry Hills, an inner-city suburb of Sydney, Australia.

Designing for himself and his partner, Sue Bassett, architect Domenic Alvaro achieved an unexpected sense of expansiveness within this small space through the use of large precast concrete panels and plate-glass windows, with minimal additional interior detailing. — Published 2012.0125

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BEST OF BUILD BOSTON

Build Boston, the largest regional conference and trade show for the design and construction industry in the United States, recently demonstrated again why it has earned such preeminence.

More than 14,000 architects, designers, construction and facility managers, and owners attended the 27th Build Boston conference, hosted by the Boston Society of Architects in November 2011. The trade show floor boasted some 300 vendors — up 6% over last year — who plied their products with the usual vigor. — Published 2012.0111

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UP ON THE ROOF

More than half of all the single-family homes in the United States were built in the last three decades of the 20th century, and it is estimated that half again of the current total number of dwellings — about 80 million — will need to be built in the next three decades of the 21st century. — Published 2011.0727

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Mixed Use Buildings

 


 
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