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Design Articles - 01
Design Articles

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STAYING PUT IN STYLE: WRAP-AROUND REMODEL

An 18th-century Federal farmhouse had multiple lean-to additions tacked onto it over its first 200 years. These served not so much to reach out to the landscape but to separate those within the house from it.

In addition, plantings that were once under control began to consume not only the home's walls but also any potential for a view from the windows that actually caught a glimpse of a backyard pond. — Published 2013.0605

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B.C. APARTMENTS

In both the emergence and ensuing development of a modern architectural idiom in Canada's Pacific Northwest, designs for the detached family home have served an important role as crucibles of exploration and research.

New materials and building technologies have been allied with challenges to conventional social habit, while the rugged terrain, lush vegetation, and benign climate have provided a profound measure to the artifice of design. — Published 2013.0605

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HOPKINS AT NORWICH

In the fourteen years between 1995 and 2009, Hopkins Architects were responsible for the design and realization of the largest building project that Norwich Cathedral had seen since the Middle Ages. — Published 2013.0515

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STAYING PUT IN STYLE: EXPANDING WITHOUT ADDING

Sometimes the way the existing space in your home is laid out makes it difficult to use or appreciate its overall dimensions.

In a 1980s addition to a classic early-19th-century Federalist-style home, a layer of living space was simply wrapped around the perimeter of the existing home’s backside, with doorways cut through the original outside walls. — Published 2013.0424

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THE STORY OF WEMBLEY STADIUM

The original Empire Stadium at Wembley was one of the wonders of its age. The focal point of the 1924 British Empire Exhibition, it was designed by Sir John Simpson and Maxwell Ayrton and engineered by Sir Owen Williams. — Published 2013.0327

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STAYING PUT IN STYLE: CONDO KITCHEN

Selectively removing a nonbearing wall connects a viewless, internal kitchen to living and dining spaces. Simple, standard detailing was used to create custom cabinets at an affordable cost.

Tall elements — range hood, refrigerator, and upper cabinets — were kept away from the opening to allow better connection. The height of the wall allows for a visual separation of whatever is on the countertop from those in the living room. — Published 2013.0306

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STEIFF FACTORY BUILDING

Due to its inherent relationship with the perception of manipulated light, the condition of translucency in architecture is often associated with primarily subjective aims: the creation of spectacle, affect, or atmosphere. But translucency also has the potential to address practical issues of function and technical performance in buildings of certain usage which may require, for instance, specific lighting conditions or degrees of privacy or publicity. — Published 2013.0306

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STAYING PUT IN STYLE: OPEN-MINDED

In a 1920s hillside upside-down house — where the living area is below the entry level — walking downstairs to get to the living room wasn’t the only aspect that was awkward.

When you arrived at the living floor you were unceremoniously dumped into a tight vestibule measuring just six feet by four feet (1.8 meters by 1.2 meters) with three three-foot-wide (0.9-meter-wide) doorways providing access into each space. — Published 2013.0213

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STAYING PUT IN STYLE: BARING ALL

Baring All

Most American suburban homes have more walls than people want. There are two types of walls in most homes: those that carry weight (bearing walls) and those that don't (nonbearing walls). — Published 2013.0109

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ESPACE JACQMOTTE - MIXED USE IN BRUSSELS

When architect Michel Jaspers discovered this full city block, which had been left vacant for decades and fallen into disrepair, he conceived to transform it into what the Espace Jacqmotte is today: probably the first large-scale mixed-use complex in the heart of the city. The aim was to provide a mix of functions, thereby fulfilling the needs of various different occupants and visitors. — Published 2013.0109

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