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LOUIS SULLIVAN'S BRADLEY HOUSE

Though perhaps best known for his public buildings in late 19th century Chicago, Louis Sullivan was also a superb residential architect, master of the style later developed further by Frank Lloyd Wright. One of Sullivan's finest examples is the Bradley House, 1910. A comparison of the completed house to its preliminary design drawings reveals much about the master's thought processes.

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DANCING ABOUT ARCHITECTURE

It has been cynically noted that writing about music is like dancing about architecture. Yes, it can be complicated and difficult to express the beauty and passion of one art form through another. But when it works—ahhh!

There was a big "ahhh!" in Chicago this past summer.

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JUST ANOTHER PRETTY FACE?

Pick up a typical architecture magazine and you become transfixed by images of new buildings and newly renovated spaces from all over the world. In our media culture, these images express the latest stylistic trends and new perceptions of space.

The media thrive on images of beautiful objects, but at what cost? While the magazines enthrall their readers with photographs of captivating objects, they may be neglecting the buildings' experiential qualities.

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"GREENING" A PROFESSION

The architecture profession is experiencing tremendous pressure to change the ways it perceives and shapes the built environment. A growing awareness of environmental issues by both architects and owners is fueling this change. In five years, I predict, today's perception of "best practice" will be a source of amusement.

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TWO BAUHAUS BUILDINGS: A PARADIGM SHIFT

The Bauhaus School buildings at Weimar and Dessau in Germany capture the dichotomy of an early 20th century debate about the impact of technology on architecture. The underlying issue was whether creativity or technology should be the stronger design determinant. It is interesting to revisit these two famous buildings, by Henry Van de Velde and Walter Gropius respectively, in light of this debate.

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THE CHANGING SHAPES OF THE AXE

Editor's Note: The vernacular houses at the foundation of an American concept of "home" have their origins in simple constructions, where tools and materials coexisted in seemingly rustic harmony. To grasp the spirit of those archetypical structures, it helps to understand the tools that shaped them.

For early Americans who built log houses, the axe was indispensable. The axe is one of the most fundamental woodworking tools, and in skilled hands, one of the most versatile.

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A MASTER ARCHITECT OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

Editor's note: Roland Terry has been one of Seattle, Washington's most beloved architects for nearly 50 years. He was a practitioner of the "Northwest Style," along with Pietro Belluschi and John Yeon. The following is an excerpt from a recently published retrospective of his work, based on interviews with Terry's contemporaries.

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PALLADIO'S FOUR BOOKS ON ARCHITECTURE

Editor's Note: In the 16th century, the great architect Andrea Palladio wrote "I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura." The influence of "The Four Books on Architecture" is still felt by professionals four centuries later. Octavo, a publisher of rare books in digital formats, has recently issued a CD-ROM reproduction of a first edition of this classic of architectural literature. The following is excerpted from a commentary by architectural historian Robert Tavernor, which is part of Octavo's publication.

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TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY URBANISM

Book Review: E-topia: "Urban Life, Jim—But Not as We Know It" by William Mitchell. The MIT Press, 1999. ISBN 0-262-13355-5.

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A NEW PERSPECTIVE ON FORMING THE AMERICAN LANDSCAPE

Book Review: Organization Space: Landscapes, Highways and Houses in America by Keller Easterling. MIT Press, 1999, ISBN 0-262-05061-7.

Some books about architecture are concerned primarily with individual buildings, or individual architects, or with architectural style. These are all interesting enough subjects, but often far from the built things that most people experience every day.

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WHAT IS THE CULTURE OF BUILDING?

With its curved metallic forms, the new Guggenheim Museum in Spain has been widely acclaimed by architecture critics as the unique and original product of a highly creative architect. Like nothing the city of Bilbao had ever seen before, it caused at least one critic to remark that the twentieth century, at its end, had finally produced a building worthy of the times.

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