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Courtyards - 01
Courtyards

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BIRD-FRIENDLY DESIGN - PART TWO: PROBLEMS WITH GLASS

Glass can be perceived differently depending on a number of factors, including how it is fabricated, the angle at which it is viewed, and the difference between exterior and interior light levels.

Combinations of these factors can cause it to look like a mirror or dark passageway, or to be completely invisible. Humans do not actually "see" most glass, but are cued by context such as mullions, roofs or doors. — Published 2013.0515

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SAINSBURY LABORATORY - STIRLING PRIZE

A stately temple of science has recently been added to the University of Cambridge campus. The limestone-clad Sainsbury Laboratory, a major plant science research center in Cambridge, England, has received the Stirling Prize for 2012 from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

Rooted in Darwin's Garden — Published 2012.1024

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DISTILLED FARMHOUSE

Compelled by sentimentality and the knowledge that the former owners (a farm family) would be retained to work the land, a Chicago couple commissioned architect Margaret McCurry to convert a 26-acre (11-hectare) farm in Galien, Michigan, into an expanded family compound while preserving as much as was practical of the original farmhouse. — Published 2012.0411

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GAP HOUSE, LONDON

Placed improbably between a pair of historical listed buildings, the contemporary facade of Gap House is a mere 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) wide. This new-build four-bedroom family home, winner of the RIBA Manser Medal for residential architecture, was designed by architect Luke Tozer of Pitman Tozer Architects for himself and his family. — Published 2012.0222

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AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECTURE AWARDS 2011

On a tiny site measuring only seven by six meters (23 by 20 feet), a compact new home rises four and a half stories amidst the urban fabric of Surry Hills, an inner-city suburb of Sydney, Australia.

Designing for himself and his partner, Sue Bassett, architect Domenic Alvaro achieved an unexpected sense of expansiveness within this small space through the use of large precast concrete panels and plate-glass windows, with minimal additional interior detailing. — Published 2012.0125

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WILLIAM WURSTER - HOUSES

Thinking back, an image that most endures in my mind is the white tower and compound of William Wurster's Gregory House (1929) in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

The Gregory Farmhouse, as it's usually referenced, is a misnomer: it is a country retreat designed and built between 1927 and 1929, a place of the soul, no doubt, for a very sophisticated San Francisco family. — Published 2011.1130

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ARCHICAD 15: PART 1

This software review takes a detailed look at ArchiCAD 15 in two parts, starting here with improvements related to "design freedom," including the new Shell tool and revamped Roof tool. —Editor

Recently we took a detailed look at the capabilities of the 2012 release of Revit Architecture, in which the new features and enhancements are spread out across many different aspects of the application. — Published 2011.1109

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2011 STIRLING PRIZE SHORTLIST

The Stirling Prize for 2011 goes to Evelyn Grace Academy by Zaha Hadid Architects, chosen from a shortlist of six outstanding projects. In this article, ArchitectureWeek documents the five outstanding projects that were shortlisted but didn't get the Stirling Prize, with commentary from the RIBA jury.

Project   Velodrome — Published 2011.1005

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KEN YEANG'S NATIONAL LIBRARY OF SINGAPORE

The Singapore National Library commission represents Ken Yeang's first large-scale built project outside Malaysia. Won in competition against firms including those led by Moshe Safdie and Michael Graves, as well as the likes of Nikken Sekkei, the library also marks the beginning of a performance-based approach to architecture. — Published 2011.0921

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UP ON THE ROOF

More than half of all the single-family homes in the United States were built in the last three decades of the 20th century, and it is estimated that half again of the current total number of dwellings — about 80 million — will need to be built in the next three decades of the 21st century. — Published 2011.0727

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