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Community Centers - 01
Community Centers

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AIA SMALL PROJECT AWARDS

When Nanette and Jerry Stump bought a wooded property in Evansville, Indiana, to build an accessible retirement home, they turned to a young architect fresh out of school: their son. — Published 2009.0812

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MICHIGAN AIA AWARDS 2009

For its new northeastern branch, the Ann Arbor District Library asked inFORM studio to design a sustainable building that would promote observation of and respect for its natural surroundings. The resulting Traverwood Branch Library traces a narrow L shape on the corner of a triangular lot, treading lightly on its wooded site while also engaging the street edge. — Published 2009.0715

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AIA/ALA LIBRARY AWARDS

In León, Mexico, a white stone-and-glass-clad structure expresses monumental solidity while maintaining indoor-outdoor connectivity. A three-story pergola of white-painted steel covers a plaza and rooftop terrace, adding a rhythmic lightness to the composition. This is the new library designed by Pei Partnership Architects for the state of Guanajuato. — Published 2009.0408

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PICTOU LANDING HEALTH CENTER

The new medical clinic and community center in the Pictou Landing First Nation in Nova Scotia recalls a longhouse, the traditional winter lodge of the Mi'kmaq.

Sustainably harvested spruce poles, six to eight inches (15 to 20 centimeters) in diameter, are bent and lashed together at the tops. Like a giant wooden model of a whale's ribcage, clad with rows of oversized spruce shingles, the peaked frame is an adaptation of traditional Native bent-wood construction. — Published 2009.0114

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MILWAUKEE'S URBAN ECOLOGY CENTER

The Urban Ecology Center in Milwaukee simply radiates with a special kind of beauty, from the inside out. It's a charming, efficient, respectful, and delightful structure, and more. It's a community building whose building has helped build a community. — Published 2007.1128

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Y INSIDE

In this suburb of the nation's capital, the Fort Washington, Maryland YMCA project is overshadowed by all the surrounding built history. Yet this rehabilitation of a former supermarket should not be underestimated. The firm of GTM Architects has successfully transformed the nondescript building into a "Y" that is at once visually poetic, pragmatically functional, and admirably committed to its community. — Published 2006.0719

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LIBRARY TECHNICS

Over the last few years, a significant change has occurred in the design of libraries, the result of changing needs, newly available services, and rapidly developing technologies.

For instance, radio frequency identification (RFID) technology is used for automatic sorting and retrieval systems (ASRS). Modern library equipment will now log a book in and send it to its proper sorting bin for reshelving. — Published 2006.0315

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JULIA MORGAN IN CHINATOWN

In 1932, architect Julia Morgan saw the opening of her YWCA building in Chinatown, San Francisco. Over 70 years later, actress Jill Jackson portrays the architect in a one-woman show, hosted by the Chinese Historical Society of America Museum and Learning Center, which now occupies the building. An excerpt shows how the play dramatizes Morgan's ideas. Editor — Published 2003.0326

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NEW DIRECTIONS IN WOOD

Wood has been used as a building material for thousands of years. Throughout history, as illustrated by ancient Greek temple design, wooden buildings served as the predecessors and prototypes of architectural designs which were not carried out in stone until a much later date. — Published 2001.1219

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HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS

In May 2001, the National Trust for Historic Preservation celebrated Preservation Week with a theme of "restore, renew, rediscover your historic neighborhood schools."

This year's event brought national attention to the danger of abandoning older schools: this practice means not only the destruction of some of our built heritage but also the loss of an important social anchor in established neighborhoods. — Published 2001.0620

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