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    QUIZ
  • ArchitectureWeek
    Classic Home Collection

    Also available on CD-ROM

    ArchWeek Image

    Classic Home 060

    "This attractive little four-room house was one of the prize-winning designs in a competition. The architect suggests that the roof covering be of nonfading green slate, that the front wall in the lower story and the walls of the entry be covered with narrow clapboards, and that the remaining walls be covered with wide clapboards, all painted pearl gray. Exterior surfaces of the walls, sash and doors, and lattice to be painted cream white. Blinds to be painted olive green. Entrance to the combination living and dining room is through the entry."

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    ArchWeek Image

    Classic Home 059

    This house was built in Los Angeles in 1939 on an extremely steep site. The foundation is an 8- by 20-foot (2.4- by 6.1-meter) concrete caisson with rigidly braced 4- by 4-inch (10- by 10-centimeter) posts, 4 feet (122 centimeters) on center. The exterior construction is stucco on metal lath. A large window on the south looks out over an adjacent lot, which is considerably lower. Otherwise, the main windows do not face the street or adjacent property.

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    Classic Home 058

    "Here is a bungalow of unusually attractive design and plan. It is especially suited to the country but would look well in a suburban location, though it would need a good-sized site to enable its full beauty to be seen. A garage is suggested in the illustration, tied into the house by a brick wall. In this arrangement, the garden and lawn would be at the opposite end with a terrace outside the living room windows. The construction of exterior walls is face brick."

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    Classic Home 057

    This steel-built house of 1200 square feet (110 square meters), was built for William Beard in Altadena, California. Full-height, sliding glass and steel partitions communicate with a side and a rear patio and to the breakfast nook and kitchen, both of which have a broad view to the Sierra Madre mountains.

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    Classic Home 056

    The exterior of this house is particularly attractive. Long roof lines have been obtained with very little sacrifice of usable space. The exterior walls are of common brick laid with wide joints, and the gables are of stucco and timber. The roof is of slate or other type of flat shingle. The entrance is from a large covered porch directly into the living room or into a small hall which provides access to living room, stairs, and kitchen. The second floor plan provides three well arranged bedrooms and a large linen closet.

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    Classic Home 055

    This house for a bachelor who entertains often sits on a hillside with a commanding view, against a background of tall firs and cedars. The wood-frame house is finished inside with white sand-floated plaster. A large section over and around fireplace is covered with zebra flexwood.

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    Classic Home 054

    "The entrance to this house leads directly into the living room, but an ample vestibule with coat closet would shut off drafts in cold weather. The staircase starts from the living room and, with the vestibule, frames an inglenook around the fireplace, adding a decorative feature to the room. The second floor provides three bedrooms of good size, well equipped with clothes closets. The porch overlooks the street and side lawn. Face brick."

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    Classic Home 053

    This house in Lincoln, Massachusetts, built by the architect for his own family, is on a site that is level in front and slopes down in the back. The house is wood frame, with steel sash casement windows and vertical tongue-and-groove redwood exterior siding, without gutters or conductors. A stone-floored entry leads to a two-story, south-facing living room. From there, stairs lead down to the dining room and up to the bedrooms. The interior walls and ceilings are plywood panels and 1/4 sawed fir. A stone-floored, screened-in porch faces west.

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    Classic Home 052

    "A porch enclosed on two sides and a widely overhanging roof give a sheltered appearance to this economically constructed house. The porch is included within the rectangle of its floor plan. On the ground floor, in addition to the living room, dining room, and kitchen, there is the always desirable feature of a bedroom and bath. The chief object of interest in the living room is the handsome open stair. There is a coat closet just outside, in the hall."

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    Classic Home 051

    "There is a comfortable cottage-like character to this house that would make it especially desirable for a country or small town home. Its simple gable roof broken by dormers would be very attractive and it has good wall space for vines to ramble over. The plan of both floors is direct and simple; the living room is of pleasing proportions and opens directly on the porch. Weathered timber work in the dormers is suggested, filled in with brick."

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    Classic Home 050

    "The Ball-Eastaway House is a long, low, single-story column and beam platform house entirely constructed in steel with a corrugated curved roof and timber terraces. It sits poised above the undulating ground level on its six I-section columns protected from bush fires with complete coverage from an external sprinkler system. The house was designed, according to the architect, to provide the minimum interference with nature and the existing site." — Dennis Sharp. Twentieth Century Architecture: a Visual History. p378.

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    Classic Home 049

    "This is a well designed house of the Western type and, though not a large house, it contains seven rooms of ample size. The living room has direct light from two sides and indirect light from the French doors that lead to the dining room. The beamed ceiling is an attractive feature. A glazed door leads to the generous living porch at the side, which augments the size of the living room. Built of frame and stucco."

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    Classic Home 048

    "Two bays on each side of this guest cottage are filled with pivoting panels which function as 1) the enclosing wall, 2) the ventilating element, 3) the shading device, and 4) the hurricane shelter. The third bay is filled with glass, to admit light and [provide] splendid views. When the panels are closed, the pavilion is snug and cave-like when open, the space psychologically changes, and one is virtually in the landscape." Paul Rudolph. The Architecture of Paul Rudolph. New York: Praeger Publishers, 1970. p42.

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    Classic Home 047

    "Here is a popular plan for a six-room house of brick construction. From the entrance at the side of the house one may go into the living room, dining room, or kitchen. There is also an entrance from the porch into the living room, which extends across the entire front of the house and has an open fireplace flanked by built-in bookcases with small windows above. The rear porch is large enough for a dining porch and above this is a sleeping porch."

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    Classic Home 046

    "Breuer's understanding of American timber balloon frame constructed on a masonry base is intelligently exaggerated in this house, designed soon after his leaving Europe. The balloon frame is constructed as a truss, allowing cantilevering of the kitchen and 'inglenook' over the lower ground floor entrance, as well as the glazed porch at right angles to the kitchen." ? David Dunster. Key Buildings of the Twentieth Century, Volume 1: Houses 1900-1944. page 98.

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    Classic Home 045

    "Here is a splendid two-story house, with exterior walls of brick, which is very popular in the South. The first floor has the splendid feature of a bedroom and bath. Entrance from the pergola is into a hall, where the stair and coat closet are located. One may also enter directly into the living room, which is well lighted on three sides and has an open fireplace. On the second floor, there are three large bedrooms and another bathroom."

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    ArchWeek Image

    Classic Home 044

    "An attractive face brick bungalow containing five rooms and bath. The roof of this house should be of masonry- or slate-surfaced shingles. Interesting features of this plan include a fireplace with large inglenook arranged as an extension of the living room. The living quarters of the house are well separated from sleeping rooms. An enclosed entry porch adds to the convenience of the kitchen. Bedrooms have ample closet space with a window in each closet."

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    ArchWeek Image

    Classic Home 043

    "The deconstructed Palladian structure of this villa is brilliantly achieved on the ground and first floors ... where the means of vertical access are directly related to the narrow bays of the Palladian tartan grid of A-B1-A-B2-A. In this matrix the left-hand service stair is rotated 90 degrees and displaced out of its bay (B2). The gyration induced by this displacement initiates the asymmetrical configuration of the first floor, where the living volume "zigzags" between the kitchen situated on the left front and the inset terrace opening towards the garden at the right rear." Kenneth Frampton, Modern Architecture 1920-1945, p295.

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    ArchWeek Image

    Classic Home 042

    "The house is a 30-foot by 44-foot (9-meter by 13-meter) rectangle, and the roof structural system extends another 30 feet (9 meters) to encompass the entry and carport. By compressing the plan, Koenig was able to establish a linear progression from the carport and main entry at the northern end of the site, through a transition zone into the living room area and out to the garden at the southern end of the axis. In the living room area is a deep pile carpet with furniture grouped to define a conversation area. Pure white vinyl tile surrounds the carpeted area and defines a circulation path." James Steele and David Jenkins, Pierre Koenig.

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    ArchWeek Image

    Classic Home 041

    "Very often a downstairs bedroom and bathroom are a great convenience, especially where there are children or elderly people in the family. Being at the back of the house in this plan, they are undisturbed by the noise of the street and enjoy privacy from the day portion of the house. Two upstairs bedrooms, a second bathroom, and a large dressing room supplement the downstairs sleeping rooms. The open stair is located in the living room."

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    ArchWeek Image

    Classic Home 040

    "It...is a fairly simple box, elaborated by the eyelashes and eyebrows of overhangs which soften the transition from the simple box to the bright light of the outside. There, I think, for the first time in several centuries, the windows came clearly to be seen not just as walls of glass as in earlier houses, nor as holes in solid walls, as in still earlier ones, but rather variously as chances to pick up light along a wall or floor or to look at a view through an opening shaded by trellises, each window responding to the special aspects of what lay beyond or the quality of entering light."

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    ArchWeek Image

    Classic Home 039

    "Here is another of the popular English type of houses with exterior walls of stucco. A porch, entirely glazed in and included under the sweep of the main roof, becomes really a sixth room and is usable the year round. The layout is almost square and the simple treatment of the exterior, and sound construction, make it an economical house. The five rooms are of good average size, and in addition there is a large storage space in the attic."

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    ArchWeek Image

    Classic Home 038

    "To accommodate the outdoor orientation of the Butlers' lifestyle, Wurster planned a progression from indoors, or enclosed space, to outdoors.

    "From the domesticated vegetation of the courtyard, one moved through the Living Porch onto the Living Terrace overflowing into the natural landscape, where one could contemplate the distant views toward the southeast...

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    ArchWeek Image

    Classic Home 037

    "The wide-spread gables, the dormer, the overhanging eaves, and the low broad porch suggest the origin of this type in the Southwest, where protection from the summer sun is always welcome. The roof line is very pleasing with its low, rambling sweep, and the porch is made somewhat secluded by the pleasing brick parapet which could lend itself to artistic treatment. The floor plan is carefully arranged for the maximum utility of space, and a basement is provided with laundry, heating apparatus, vegetable cellar, and storage rooms. Face brick exterior."

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    More Classic Homes - 025 to 036

    More Classic Homes - 013 to 024

    More Classic Homes - 001 to 012


     

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