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    Classic Home Collection - 05
    Classic Home Collection page: [prev] | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | [next]

    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 035

    "Although the roof of this six-room English cottage has a low effect, it attains sufficient height for two fine bedrooms on the second floor. To gain the best effect, this house should be built close to the ground in front, with the grade sloping to the rear, where basement windows are located. As there is a bath and bedroom on the ground floor, only the four lower rooms need be finished at first, leaving the upper floor until later. If, however, the rooms upstairs are also finished when the house is built, the bedroom and bath on the main floor may be replanned." — Published 2002.0807

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 034

    "The Davis House is an elegant, shingle-clad home that exemplifes doing more with less. Its compact plan is a result of designing for an unusually small lot. But careful control of room proportions and strategic placement of openings between rooms provide a feeling of spaciousness throughout the house. Thoughtfully placed windows and French doors along the south wall open up the main interior living spaces to an adjacent 'outdoor room.' The entire upper floor is devoted to a large master bedroom suite. This floor is efficiently contained within the volume formed by the steep gable roof, taking advantage of what could otherwise be unused space. This has the simultaneous effect of maintaining the intimate proportions of the house while offering lovely vaulted ceilings in the master suite." — Published 2002.0724

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 033

    "Here is an unusually interesting English cottage type of house. Common brick with wide mortar joints and irregular spacing is used for the exterior walls with an upper gable of shingles. The roof is of irregular slate laid in an unusual pattern. The design calls for casement windows, and a good architectural feature is the small bay window in the second floor bedroom. This is a six-room house with one bedroom on the main floor. The living room is built almost as a separate unit with no second floor." — Published 2002.0710

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 032

    "The decided irregularity of the exterior of this house makes it uncommonly attractive and interesting. The finish is stucco, and the roof is shingled with either wood or fire-resistant materials. The arrangement of rooms on both floors is convenient. The stairs are especially well placed to ensure economy of space and to reduce the size of the second floor hall to the minimum. Plenty of closet space is a feature that will appeal to all."

    — Published 2002.0619

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 031

    An extremely practical and attractive type of six-room bungalow with an exterior of stucco and half-timbered gables and a shingle roof applied with double lap at intervals to provide parallel shadow lines. At the side of the house there is an unusually large enclosed porch which may be omitted for economy when the house is first constructed. This porch constitutes the main entrance and if omitted, entrance must be directly into the living room. From the porch a central hall connects with all rooms in the house. — Published 2002.0605

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 030

    "This type of simple, economical Colonial house is favored where it is necessary to conserve the original investment. The house is of frame construction throughout, with wide siding and a chimney of brick. A broad porch extends the entire width of the front, and entrance is into a small hall from which a central staircase leads upward. Doors open to the right and left into the living room and dining room. An open fireplace is provided in the living room, with the additional feature of a small den." — Published 2002.0522

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 029

    "Here is a plan that would solve the narrow-lot problem for many. Although it occupies small ground space this house has all the comforts of a home, even including a reception hall, coat closet, dining alcove, and towel closet. The fireplace is the center of interest in the living room and the casements at each side are high enough that permanent bookcases may be built in beneath them. The dining room has double windows on two sides, making it light and cheerful. There is a built-in sideboard which may also be used as a dresser from the kitchen." — Published 2002.0508

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 028

    "This Dutch Colonial house can be placed very comfortably on a thirty-foot lot, and can be used on a twenty-five-foot lot without crowding. Three features save this house from having a pinched look: First, it is built close to the ground; second, it has lawn on both sides, and third, the skillful handling of the red cement shingle roof, particularly the broad expanse over the front entrance and sun parlor. It is remarkable what spacious rooms have been contrived in this small house. The living room is the full width of the house with fireplace and bookshelves at the end." — Published 2002.0501

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 027

    "This type of colonial frame dwelling is particularly well suited for a location on gently sloping, wooded property such as that indicated in the photograph. The hooded entrance porch opens into a small vestibule, which is provided with a clothes closet. The vestibule forms part of a large central hall; at its rear is a staircase lighted by a window. From the central hall, wide inter-room openings provide access to the living room and dining room. The living room has a large brick and tile fireplace." — Published 2002.0417

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 026

    "The most interesting point about this house is the manner in which the main roof slope is continued down over the porch. The effect gained thereby is quite pleasing and gives an opportunity for a larger room on the second floor. The living room has two features; the fireplace in the front end and the open stairway in the rear. The two bedrooms on the second floor are large and well arranged. Although the illustration shows the use of brick, this house might be built of stucco over hollow tile, or of other construction materials." — Published 2002.0410

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    Classic Home Collection page: [prev] | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | [next]

     

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