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    Classic Home Collection - 04
    Classic Home Collection page: [prev] | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | [next]

    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 044

    "An attractive face brick bungalow containing five rooms and bath. The roof of this house should be of masonry- or slate-surfaced shingles. Interesting features of this plan include a fireplace with large inglenook arranged as an extension of the living room. The living quarters of the house are well separated from sleeping rooms. An enclosed entry porch adds to the convenience of the kitchen. Bedrooms have ample closet space with a window in each closet."

    — Published 2003.0108

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 042

    — Published 2004.0428

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 043

    "The deconstructed Palladian structure of this villa is brilliantly achieved on the ground and first floors ... where the means of vertical access are directly related to the narrow bays of the Palladian tartan grid of A-B1-A-B2-A. In this matrix the left-hand service stair is rotated 90 degrees and displaced out of its bay (B2). The gyration induced by this displacement initiates the asymmetrical configuration of the first floor, where the living volume "zigzags" between the kitchen situated on the left front and the inset terrace opening towards the garden at the right rear." Kenneth Frampton, Modern Architecture 1920-1945, p295. — Published 2002.1218

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 042

    "The house is a 30-foot by 44-foot (9-meter by 13-meter) rectangle, and the roof structural system extends another 30 feet (9 meters) to encompass the entry and carport. By compressing the plan, Koenig was able to establish a linear progression from the carport and main entry at the northern end of the site, through a transition zone into the living room area and out to the garden at the southern end of the axis. In the living room area is a deep pile carpet with furniture grouped to define a conversation area. Pure white vinyl tile surrounds the carpeted area and defines a circulation path." James Steele and David Jenkins, Pierre Koenig. — Published 2002.1204

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    CLASSIC HOME 041

    "Very often a downstairs bedroom and bathroom are a great convenience, especially where there are children or elderly people in the family. Being at the back of the house in this plan, they are undisturbed by the noise of the street and enjoy privacy from the day portion of the house. Two upstairs bedrooms, a second bathroom, and a large dressing room supplement the downstairs sleeping rooms. The open stair is located in the living room."

    — Published 2002.1113

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    CLASSIC HOME 040

    "It...is a fairly simple box, elaborated by the eyelashes and eyebrows of overhangs which soften the transition from the simple box to the bright light of the outside. There, I think, for the first time in several centuries, the windows came clearly to be seen not just as walls of glass as in earlier houses, nor as holes in solid walls, as in still earlier ones, but rather variously as chances to pick up light along a wall or floor or to look at a view through an opening shaded by trellises, each window responding to the special aspects of what lay beyond or the quality of entering light." — Published 2002.1030

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 039

    "Here is another of the popular English type of houses with exterior walls of stucco. A porch, entirely glazed in and included under the sweep of the main roof, becomes really a sixth room and is usable the year round. The layout is almost square and the simple treatment of the exterior, and sound construction, make it an economical house. The five rooms are of good average size, and in addition there is a large storage space in the attic." — Published 2002.1016

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 038

    "To accommodate the outdoor orientation of the Butlers' lifestyle, Wurster planned a progression from indoors, or enclosed space, to outdoors.

    "From the domesticated vegetation of the courtyard, one moved through the Living Porch onto the Living Terrace overflowing into the natural landscape, where one could contemplate the distant views toward the southeast... — Published 2002.0925

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 037

    "The wide-spread gables, the dormer, the overhanging eaves, and the low broad porch suggest the origin of this type in the Southwest, where protection from the summer sun is always welcome. The roof line is very pleasing with its low, rambling sweep, and the porch is made somewhat secluded by the pleasing brick parapet which could lend itself to artistic treatment. The floor plan is carefully arranged for the maximum utility of space, and a basement is provided with laundry, heating apparatus, vegetable cellar, and storage rooms. Face brick exterior." — Published 2002.0911

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 036

    The Allewelt House near Madera, California is a little-known California modern classic — neotraditional on the outside, unique on the inside, appropriate to its context both formally and technically, and boldly individual at the same time. The expansive wrap-around porches and the sculptural inner courtyard carved from the simple gable roof provide sensitive adaptations to the hot dry Central California climate.

    — Published 2002.0828

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    Classic Home Collection page: [prev] | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | [next]

     

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