ArchitectureWeek
 
Classic Home Collection - 03
Classic Home Collection

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CLASSIC HOME 054

"The entrance to this house leads directly into the living room, but an ample vestibule with coat closet would shut off drafts in cold weather. The staircase starts from the living room and, with the vestibule, frames an inglenook around the fireplace, adding a decorative feature to the room. The second floor provides three bedrooms of good size, well equipped with clothes closets. The porch overlooks the street and side lawn. Face brick."

— Published 2003.0709

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CLASSIC HOME 053

This house in Lincoln, Massachusetts, built by the architect for his own family, is on a site that is level in front and slopes down in the back. The house is wood frame, with steel sash casement windows and vertical tongue-and-groove redwood exterior siding, without gutters or conductors. A stone-floored entry leads to a two-story, south-facing living room. From there, stairs lead down to the dining room and up to the bedrooms. The interior walls and ceilings are plywood panels and 1/4 sawed fir. A stone-floored, screened-in porch faces west. — Published 2003.0618

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CLASSIC HOME 052

"A porch enclosed on two sides and a widely overhanging roof give a sheltered appearance to this economically constructed house. The porch is included within the rectangle of its floor plan. On the ground floor, in addition to the living room, dining room, and kitchen, there is the always desirable feature of a bedroom and bath. The chief object of interest in the living room is the handsome open stair. There is a coat closet just outside, in the hall." — Published 2003.0528

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CLASSIC HOME 051

"There is a comfortable cottage-like character to this house that would make it especially desirable for a country or small town home. Its simple gable roof broken by dormers would be very attractive and it has good wall space for vines to ramble over. The plan of both floors is direct and simple; the living room is of pleasing proportions and opens directly on the porch. Weathered timber work in the dormers is suggested, filled in with brick."

— Published 2003.0514

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CLASSIC HOME 050

"The house is a long, low, single-story column and beam platform house entirely constructed in steel with a corrugated curved roof and timber terraces. It sits poised above the undulating ground level on its six I-section columns protected from bush fires with complete coverage from an external sprinkler system. The house was designed, according to the architect, to provide the minimum interference with nature and the existing site. A small, open-sided platform bridge runs from the car parking enclosure to the house itself, another precarious reminder of the vulnerability of living in the countryside. Adjacent to the house are two commercial farmyard Dutch barns, purchased straight out of a catalogue but ingeniously converted into spacious and waterproof artists' studios." Dennis Sharp. Twentieth Century Architecture: a Visual History. p378. — Published 2003.0430

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CLASSIC HOME 049

"This is a well designed house of the Western type and, though not a large house, it contains seven rooms of ample size. The living room has direct light from two sides and indirect light from the French doors that lead to the dining room. The beamed ceiling is an attractive feature. A glazed door leads to the generous living porch at the side, which augments the size of the living room. Built of frame and stucco."

— Published 2003.0416

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CLASSIC HOME 048

"Two bays on each side of this guest cottage are filled with pivoting panels which function as 1) the enclosing wall, 2) the ventilating element, 3) the shading device, and 4) the hurricane shelter. The third bay is filled with glass, to admit light and [provide] splendid views. When the panels are closed, the pavilion is snug and cave-like when open, the space psychologically changes, and one is virtually in the landscape." Paul Rudolph. The Architecture of Paul Rudolph. New York: Praeger Publishers, 1970. p42. — Published 2003.0326

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CLASSIC HOME 047

"Here is a popular plan for a six-room house of brick construction. From the entrance at the side of the house one may go into the living room, dining room, or kitchen. There is also an entrance from the porch into the living room, which extends across the entire front of the house and has an open fireplace flanked by built-in bookcases with small windows above. The rear porch is large enough for a dining porch and above this is a sleeping porch." — Published 2003.0305

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CLASSIC HOME 046

"Breuer's understanding of American timber balloon frame constructed on a masonry base is intelligently exaggerated in this house, designed soon after his leaving Europe. The balloon frame is constructed as a truss, allowing cantilevering of the kitchen and 'inglenook' over the lower ground floor entrance, as well as the glazed porch at right angles to the kitchen." ? David Dunster. Key Buildings of the Twentieth Century, Volume 1: Houses 1900-1944. page 98.

— Published 2003.0219

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CLASSIC HOME 045

"Here is a splendid two-story house, with exterior walls of brick, which is very popular in the South. The first floor has the splendid feature of a bedroom and bath. Entrance from the pergola is into a hall, where the stair and coat closet are located. One may also enter directly into the living room, which is well lighted on three sides and has an open fireplace. On the second floor, there are three large bedrooms and another bathroom."

— Published 2003.0205

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