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    Classic Home Collection - 02
    Classic Home Collection page: [prev] | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | [next]

    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 064

    This small house in Kawagoe, Japan was designed for a family of five, including two children and the owner's elderly mother. At the owner's request, the house is as open as possible to foster an atmosphere of closeness among family members. The only permanent partitions enclose the bathroom suite, which can be further subdivided with sliding doors and nylon curtains. Movable nylon curtains define laundry and dressing areas adjacent to the bathroom and a small kitchen along the north wall. Four large wood boxes on casters serve as bedrooms. Open on two sides, these boxes can be moved throughout the main interior open space and even outside through the western wall. The structural system of this house consists of double-stud, 12-inch- (30-centimeter-) thick walls supporting low-arc roof trusses. Walls are finished on the exterior with clear corrugated plastic and inside with stretched white nylon fabric. Insulation is polyethelene foam stuffed into clear plastic bags, allowing diffuse light to permeate the interior. — Published 2006.0628

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 063

    These houses in Neuilly-sur-Seine, Paris, France are situated on a constrained semiurban site amid much larger, multiunit apartments. Originally designed for the families of André Jaoul and his son Michel, each house has two full floors and a penthouse suite. A narrow walkway slopes up from the street to entrances off a shared patio. The buildings are carefully positioned at right angles to one another on the site, with strategic setbacks from all the property lines, except to the south. There, unit A abuts the wall of an adjacent building. The result is a sequence of increasingly private outdoor spaces. Intentional placement of trees and windows further minimizes views between the two houses and from adjacent buildings. — Published 2006.0531

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 062

    This house near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil was designed by the architect for himself. Nestled on a dramatic site between two hills, this four-bedroom, four-bath home commands an impressive down-slope view. To maintain these views, most of the private spaces are situated below ground, while floor-to-ceiling glass walls predominate in the common spaces at ground level. Ample patio space surrounds the curvaceous main floor, reinforcing a close relationship with the landscape. Meanwhile, a free-form flat roof offers shade and definition to both indoor and outdoor spaces. — Published 2006.0419

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 061

    This house in Lincoln, Massachusetts was built on a site near the Gropius House and the Breuer II House. The design originally accommodated two adults, a daughter, and a maid on a sloping site at the edge of the woods. The house is oriented for sunlight and views to a small pond to the south. The house is wood frame with vertical siding and steel casement windows. A flagstone terrace with trellis is adjacent to a small dining room along the southeast corner. A sun screen composed of redwood boards and specially designed brackets runs the entire length of the south wall at the upper floor windows. — Published 2006.0315

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    CLASSIC HOME 060

    "This attractive little four-room house was one of the prize-winning designs in a competition. The architect suggests that the roof covering be of nonfading green slate, that the front wall in the lower story and the walls of the entry be covered with narrow clapboards, and that the remaining walls be covered with wide clapboards, all painted pearl gray. Exterior surfaces of the walls, sash and doors, and lattice to be painted cream white. Blinds to be painted olive green. Entrance to the combination living and dining room is through the entry." — Published 2003.1008

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 059

    This house was built in Los Angeles in 1939 on an extremely steep site. The foundation is an 8- by 20-foot (2.4- by 6.1-meter) concrete caisson with rigidly braced 4- by 4-inch (10- by 10-centimeter) posts, 4 feet (122 centimeters) on center. The exterior construction is stucco on metal lath. A large window on the south looks out over an adjacent lot, which is considerably lower. Otherwise, the main windows do not face the street or adjacent property.

    — Published 2003.0924

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 058

    "Here is a bungalow of unusually attractive design and plan. It is especially suited to the country but would look well in a suburban location, though it would need a good-sized site to enable its full beauty to be seen. A garage is suggested in the illustration, tied into the house by a brick wall. In this arrangement, the garden and lawn would be at the opposite end with a terrace outside the living room windows. The construction of exterior walls is face brick." — Published 2003.0910

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 057

    This steel-built house of 1200 square feet (110 square meters), was built for William Beard in Altadena, California. Full-height, sliding glass and steel partitions communicate with a side and a rear patio and to the breakfast nook and kitchen, both of which have a broad view to the Sierra Madre mountains.

    — Published 2003.0827

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 056

    The exterior of this house is particularly attractive. Long roof lines have been obtained with very little sacrifice of usable space. The exterior walls are of common brick laid with wide joints, and the gables are of stucco and timber. The roof is of slate or other type of flat shingle. The entrance is from a large covered porch directly into the living room or into a small hall which provides access to living room, stairs, and kitchen. The second floor plan provides three well arranged bedrooms and a large linen closet. — Published 2003.0813

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    ArchWeek Image

    CLASSIC HOME 055

    This house for a bachelor who entertains often sits on a hillside with a commanding view, against a background of tall firs and cedars. The wood-frame house is finished inside with white sand-floated plaster. A large section over and around fireplace is covered with zebra flexwood. — Published 2003.0723

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    Classic Home Collection page: [prev] | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | [next]

     

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