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Architecture Design and Building in Washington, D.C., USA - 01
Architecture Design and Building in Washington, D.C., USA

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KENNEDY CENTER GALLERY

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts by Edward Durell Stone is a major architectural and cultural landmark on the banks of the Potomac in Washington, D.C., as well as a white marble living memorial to the Camelot President. — Published 2012.0208

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CREATING THE KENNEDY CENTER

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts was problematic for the office of architect Edward Durell Stone. At the project's inception as the National Cultural Center, Washington, D.C., had lacked a venue for performing arts commensurate with the city's role in the life of the nation and the world. — Published 2012.0208

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MOSHE SAFDIE BUILDS FOR PEACE

From the intersection of 23rd Street and Constitution Avenue in Washington, D.C., at a corner of the U.S. National Mall near the Potomac River, the grandeur of the Lincoln Memorial is due south, and war-related memorials to Vietnam veterans, World War II, and George Washington, among others, unfold to the left, southeastward. — Published 2011.1109

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SOLAR DECATHLON 2011

In the U.S. Department of Energy's recent Solar Decathlon, architecture and engineering students competed to build the most efficient, innovative, economical, and attractive home powered by the sun. — Published 2011.1012

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CRANE COLLAPSE SHIFTS MEMORIAL EVENTS

Around 11 o'clock on the morning of Wednesday, September 7, in Washington, D.C., a 400-foot-tall, 500-ton Liebherr crane collapsed in a thunderstorm wind gust at the National Cathedral. The crane had been working on securing the building after recent earthquake damage, in anticipation of 9/11 memorial observances — slated to include President Obama this Sunday, September 11. — Published 2011.0907

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UP ON THE ROOF

More than half of all the single-family homes in the United States were built in the last three decades of the 20th century, and it is estimated that half again of the current total number of dwellings — about 80 million — will need to be built in the next three decades of the 21st century. — Published 2011.0727

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DESIGNING A SMITHSONIAN ROOF

Foster + Partners won an invited international architecture competition in 2004 to design a new courtyard enclosure for the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, housed in the Old Patent Office building in Washington, D.C. Early in the project, the firm's Specialist Modelling Group was brought in to advise the project team on modeling techniques, to develop new digital tools, and help solve the complex geometric issues involved. — Published 2010.1027

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CREATING THE WASHINGTON METRO

The Washington, D.C., Metro project established Harry Weese & Associates as the country's foremost architectural designer of rail transit systems, and led to the firm's involvement in the planning and conceptual design of systems in cities in North America and overseas, including Miami, Los Angeles, Dallas, Buffalo, Toronto, and Singapore. Jack Hartray characterized the Metro as the "greatest architectural opportunity" of the 20th century, and Stanley Allan called it the "crown jewel" in the history of the Weese firm's commissions. — Published 2010.1027

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HOUSE FOR SWEDEN

The 70,000-square-foot (6,500-square-meter) building for the Swedish Embassy in Washington, D.C., is set on a narrow peninsula at the confluence of Rock Creek and the Potomac River. Surrounded by water on three sides, the peninsula faces south and commands spectacular views up and down the Potomac.

The prominent site called for an emblematic building through which the essence of Swedish culture, technology, design sensibility, and governance would be expressed. — Published 2008.0910

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NEWSEUM BY POLSHEK

The Newseum building by Polshek Partnership Architects adds vitality and a sense of time and place to Pennsylvania Avenue, a street that, like so many important streets in Washington, D.C., had been devoid of movement and three-dimensionality in massing.

A museum about news, the aptly named Newseum moved from across the Potomac River, in Arlington, Virginia, where it had outgrown its space. Its parent organization, the Freedom Forum, sought a location more heavily frequented by tourists. — Published 2008.0903

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Architecture Design and Building in Washington, D.C., USA

 


 
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