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    QUIZ

     
    ArchitectureWeek Notes No. 529
    Dear ArchitectureWeek Readers,

    As Hurricane Irene works its way north along the U.S. eastern seaboard, likely to sorely strain buildings of all types, fell trees, and flood landscapes, ArchitectureWeek No. 529 is now available on the Web, with these new design and building features, and more. This Notes edition is sponsored by TXI Expanded Shale & Clay:

    TXI ES&C

    TXI ES&C's Lightweight Aggregate is "In the Mix" at John Wayne Airport's Terminal C

    To accommodate more passengers and destinations, the Orange County airport's new Terminal C will launch in December 2011. With TXI's lightweight aggregate in the mix, the project is sure to be rock-solid.

    Learn more

     
     
    Cover Story

    The new civil engineering building at the University of Minnesota Duluth, by Ross Barney Architects, exposes tough, classic, industrial steel structure along with sensitive, unusual environmental features, in a LEED Gold-certified package. Photo: Kate Joyce Studios/ Courtesy Ross Barney Architects

    STUDY IN ENGINEERING
    by Michael J. Crosbie

    Architecture as a teaching tool is a very old idea. Think about those cathedrals whose stained glass and sculpture indoctrinated their congregations on the lessons of Christianity. And when Thomas Jefferson was planning the University of Virginia, it is said that he intended the architecture to function partially as text; he had designed the pavilions along the great lawn in different architectural styles to instruct students on Western architecture's greatest achievements.

    Architecture as a teaching tool is a very old idea. Think about those cathedrals whose stained glass and sculpture indoctrinated their congregations on the lessons of Christianity. And when Thomas Jefferson was planning the University of Virginia, it is said that he intended the architecture to function partially as text; he had designed the pavilions along the great lawn in different architectural styles to instruct students on Western architecture's greatest achievements.

    And in that pedagogical spirit, a new 35,300-square-foot (3,280-square-meter) building for the civil engineering program at the University of Minnesota Duluth is designed to teach students about materials, how they go together, how they age, and how they express the forces inherent in any structure.

    "We started by asking, 'What do they need to learn as engineers, and what forces do they need to control?'" says architect Carol Ross Barney of Chicago, who designed the Swenson Civil Engineering Building. (The associate architect was SJA Architects of Duluth.)

    Civil engineers design infrastructure to move water, to move traffic, to hold back the earth, to span long distances. In the northeastern part of Minnesota, including Duluth, civil engineers are particularly occupied with mining in the state's Iron Range, where iron ore is extracted. These aspects of professional focus and the special features of this region led Barney to design an engineering building that couldn't be anywhere else, for any other discipline.   >>>

     
    Tools Feature

    Revit Architecture 2012 includes support for importing point cloud data sets, captured from existing buildings by detailed laser scanning. Image: AECbytes

    Revit Architecture 2012: Part 1
    by Lachmi Khemlani

    This software review takes a detailed look at Revit Architecture 2012, released in March 2011, to see how much progress it has made since the last two releases. This two-part review starts here by examining improvements to the core Revit platform and new tools for construction modeling. —Editor

    Key Enhancements to the Revit Platform

    In Autodesk's 2012 product release, individual applications have been packaged into "suites" for different industries, which are available for installation on a single flash drive. Thus, Revit Architecture 2012 is available both as a stand-alone application and as part of the Premium and Ultimate Building Design suites.

    I installed it as part of the Premium Building Design Suite, which also included the 2012 versions of the other two disciplinary BIM applications, Revit Structure and Revit MEP, as well as 3ds Max Design, AutoCAD, AutoCAD Architecture, AutoCAD MEP, AutoCAD Structural Detailing, Autodesk Showcase, and Autodesk SketchBook Designer.

    I was indeed able to install all of these applications from a single USB key — it took several hours because of the number of applications, but it was very convenient not having to install by cycling through multiple CDs/ DVDs, as I have had to do with large applications in the past.

    Let us start by looking at the main enhancements to the core Revit platform, which are available in all the three Revit disciplinary BIM applications, including Revit Architecture.

    Revit can now import point clouds, with snapping capabilities that allow Revit elements to be accurately modeled in reference to imported laser scans, which is very helpful for renovation and retrofit projects. Prior to the 2012 release, Revit users had to rely on AutoCAD for point cloud support, which had been introduced in AutoCAD 2011, released in 2010. Revit now supports point clouds natively, using the same point cloud engine as AutoCAD.

    There is a new Point Cloud tool in the Insert tab, which can be used to import raw point cloud data in eight different formats, covering all the popular laser scanning devices.   >>>

     
    It's fast, easy, private, and secure.
     

     Tools and Downloads

    Sponsor this ArchWeek special section and build your brand:
     
    Update to AutoCAD Web and Mobile Access
    Autodesk recently released an update to AutoCAD WS, which enables users to view, edit, and share their AutoCAD designs and DWG files through web browsers and mobile devices. The AutoCAD WS 1.1 plugin and mobile app are currently available for free (subject to terms and conditions):  
     
    4D Modeling of Industrial Projects
    Synchro Ltd. has issued a white paper on the emerging technology of four-dimensional modeling and planning of industrial projects: "4D Modeling of Large Industrial Projects Using Spatio-Temporal Decomposition," by V.A. Seminov and Tom Dengenis.
     

    Steve Jobs Reshaped Industries - New York Times, 2011.0825

    Create Product Documentation with Inventor Publisher 2012 - Cadalyst, 2011.0825

    Official CMS IntelliCAD 7 Released - IntelliCAD , 2011.0825

    Going Paperless - Metropolis POV, 2011.0824

    Revit Architecture 2012: Part 1 - ArchitectureWeek, 2011.0824

    University of Michigan Dean Explores the Role of Digital Craft in Modern Practice. - Architect's Newspaper, 2011.0824

    Autodesk's CEO Discusses Q2 2012 Results - Seeking Alpha, 2011.0819


     
    New Product

     

    Product News - Decorative Limestone Plasters

    SuperStrata has adapted limestone plaster for a wide variety of modern and contemporary applications, going beyond the traditional high-polished aesthetic of Venetian plaster. The company introduces materials such as clay, mica, semiprecious stones, and geometric and screen-printed patterns to the limestone plaster, which is an elastic, durable, luminous, mold-resistant medium that lends itself to deep coloration. One new finish is "Boucle" (pictured), reminiscent in texture of the bouclé fabric popularized by Coco Chanel. Other recent additions to the line of wall finishes incorporate glittering mica, and broken silver or gold leaf. Color is customizable.

     

    See our comprehensive new visual catalog of architectural products, powered by DesignGuide!
     

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    Contents, RSS, and Surface of the Week

    Black granite cladding and metal-and-glass curtain wall (WA-293)

     

    Architecture Quiz this week's new question...

    This English architect designed Trinity Church in New York City and was the AIA's first president. Who was he?

     
    Architecture Answer for last week's quiz...

    Masonry fireplaces in the eastern United States typically have a cast iron damper, while steel dampers are more popular in the West. To avoid rust, stainless steel dampers are favored along the coast. What is the major disadvantage of each?


     
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    Classic Home 062 — Casa das Canoas, by Oscar Niemeyer

    "This house near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil was designed by the architect for himself. Nestled on a dramatic site between two hills, this four-bedroom, four-bath home commands an impressive down-slope view. To maintain these views, most of the private spaces are situated below ground, while floor-to-ceiling glass walls predominate in the common spaces at ground level. Ample patio space surrounds the curvaceous main floor, reinforcing a close relationship with the landscape.... "

     

     
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