ArchitectureWeek - Dimensions
HOME   |   DESIGN   |   PEOPLE & PLACES   |   CONTEXT   |   CULTURE   |   TECHNOLOGY   |   SEARCH

Topics Index
Architects Index
Authors Index

ArchitectureWeek Notes
  •  Notes No. 581
  •  Notes No. 580
  •  Notes No. 579
  •  Notes No. 578
  •  Notes No. 577
  •  Notes No. 576
  •  Notes No. 575
  •  Notes No. 574
  •  Notes No. 573
  •  Notes No. 572
  •  Notes No. 571
  •  Notes No. 570
  •  Notes No. 569
  •  Notes No. 568
  •  Notes No. 567
  •  Notes No. 566
  •  Notes No. 565
  •  Notes No. 564
  •  Notes No. 563
  •  Notes No. 562
  •  Notes No. 561
  •  Notes No. 560
  •  Notes No. 559
  •  Notes No. 558
  •  Notes No. 557
  •  Notes No. 556
  •  Notes No. 555
  •  Notes No. 554
  •  Notes No. 553
  •  Notes No. 552
  •  Notes No. 551
  •  Notes No. 550
  •  Notes No. 549
  •  Notes No. 548
  •  Notes No. 547
  •  Notes No. 546
  •  Notes No. 545
  •  Notes No. 544
  •  Notes No. 543
  •  Notes No. 541
  •  Notes No. 540
  •  Notes No. 539
  •  Notes No. 538
  •  Notes No. 537
  •  Notes No. 536
  •  Notes No. 535
  •  Notes No. 534
  •  Notes No. 533
  •  Notes No. 532
  •  Notes No. 531
  •  Notes No. 530
  •  Notes No. 529
  •  Notes No. 528
  •  Notes No. 527
  •  Notes No. 526
  •  Notes No. 525
  •  Notes No. 524
  •  Notes No. 523
  •  Notes No. 522
  •  Notes No. 521
  •  Notes No. 520
  •  Notes No. 519
  •  Notes No. 518
  •  Notes No. 517
  •  Notes No. 516
  •  Notes No. 515
  •  Notes No. 514
  •  Notes No. 513
  •  Notes No. 512
  •  Notes No. 511
  •  Notes No. 510
  •  Notes No. 509
  •  Notes No. 508
  •  Notes No. 507
  •  Notes No. 506
  •  Notes No. 505
  •  Notes No. 504
  •  Notes No. 503
  •  Notes No. 502
  •  Notes No. 501
  •  Notes No. 500
  •  Notes No. 499
  •  Notes No. 498
  •  Notes No. 497
  •  Notes No. 496
  •  Notes No. 495
  •  Notes No. 494
  •  Notes No. 493
  •  Notes No. 492
  •  Notes No. 491
  •  Notes No. 490
        and Before

    ArchWeek Notes
    ArchWeek Green
    ArchWeek Residential
    Subscribe Free

  •  
    IN THIS ISSUE
     Contents/RSS
    Design
    Urban Infill Prefab
    Design
    Staying Put - Creating A Cook's Kitchen
    Culture
    "The Store Problem"

     
    [an error occurred while processing this directive]
     
    AND MORE
      Current Contents
      Blog Center
      Download Center
      New Products
      Products Guide
      Classic Home
      Architecture Forum
      Architects Directory
      Topics Library
      Complete Archive
      Web Directory
      About ArchWeek
      Search
      Subscribe & Contribute
      Free Newsletters
       

     
    QUIZ

     
    ArchitectureWeek Notes No. 519
    Dear ArchitectureWeek Readers,

    ArchitectureWeek No. 519 is now available on the Web, with these new design and building features, and more. This Notes edition is sponsored by Alcoa:

    Acorn Media

    It's not science fiction. It's the innovative science behind Reynobond® with EcoClean™. Powered by Hydrotect™.

    For decades, scientists have recognized that, when exposed to sunlight, titanium dioxide acts as a catalyst to break down organic matter, while also creating a super hydrophilic (water-loving) surface. Alcoa Architectural Products has developed a proprietary process that leverages Hydrotect technology from Toto® to apply a titanium dioxide coating called EcoClean to the pre-painted aluminum surface of Reynobond. The result is the world's first coil-coated aluminum architectural panel that helps clean itself and the air around it.

    Learn More

     
     
    thumbnail

    A major addition to Frank Lloyd Wright's Unitarian Meeting House in Madison, Wisconsin, by The Kubala Washatko Architects, stands for itself elegantly, even while deferring to the masterwork it supports. Photo: © The Kubala Washatko Architects, Inc./ Mark F. Heffron

    AN EXCELLENT ADDITION
    by Michael J. Crosbie

    Designing an appropriate addition to almost any National Historic Landmark should be seen as a challenge. When the landmark building is by Frank Lloyd Wright, the challenge acquires its own dimension in history.

    In their new addition to an American masterpiece of religious architecture — Wright's First Unitarian Society Meeting House in Madison, Wisconsin — The Kubala Washatko Architects has risen beautifully to such a challenge.

    The large new annex contains an auditorium, social/ fellowship space, offices, a library, and support spaces. Yet it looks as though it was always meant to be there, showing deference to Wright's opus yet asserting its own quiet identity. In the spirit of Wright's approach to "designing with nature," as he often described it, the Meeting House addition is "green."

    The addition has also earned LEED Gold certification and is one of the Top Ten Green Projects chosen for 2011 by the Committee on the Environment (COTE) of the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

    The new expansion project had a long genesis. Wright's original building was designed in 1946 and completed in 1951. Relatives of the architect had been founding members of this Unitarian congregation, and Wright himself was a member. He designed a facility to accommodate 150 parishioners.

    Wright's building is iconic with its triangular glass prism form under a broad A-frame roof, an architectural composition that suggests an abstraction of Albrecht Dürer's drawing The Hands of the Apostle. That part of the building contains the tall worship space, with a low wing extending to the west containing classrooms and social spaces.   >>>

     

     
    thumbnail

    Christie Walk consists of 27 dwellings ranging from single-family cottages to townhouses and apartment buildings, achieving a site population density of around 200 people per hectare (about 80 people per acre).

    Pocket Neighborhoods
    by Ross Chapin

    Architect Ross Chapin defines a "pocket neighborhood" as a "cohesive cluster of homes gathered around some kind of common ground within a larger surrounding neighborhood" — achieving a small scale at which meaningful neighborly relationships are fostered. Here he discusses a 19th-century precedent for the pocket neighborhood, along with three modern examples. —Editor

    Workingmen's Cottages of Warren Place

    Alfred Tredway White, the son of a wealthy New York importer, built affordable housing for over a thousand working families in Brooklyn in the late 19th century.

    While making house calls to newly settled immigrants in his church district, White experienced firsthand the terrible living conditions of the urban poor. His efforts with housing reform created fireproof brick buildings with sunlit rooms and private toilets (what luxury!), always surrounding a shared green or park.

    The Workingmen's Cottages of Warren Place, built in 1878, were a cluster of 26 row houses facing a garden mews and flanked by eight end houses.

    Spanning between two parallel streets at mid-block, the formal garden is a semipublic space buffering the private entrances from the street. A second entrance is provided at the rear along a common, undivided walkway in the back. Each row house is just 11 feet (3.4 meters) wide, about 30 feet (nine meters) deep, and three stories tall.   >>>

     
    P&P

    The Whitney Museum of American Art and the City of New York have broken ground adjacent to Manhattan's High Line park for the Whitney's new museum building, designed by Renzo Piano in collaboration with Cooper, Robertson & Partners. Courtesy Renzo Piano Building Workshop and Cooper, Robertson & Partners

    People and Places
    by Nancy Novitski

    Renzo Piano with Cooper, Robertson & Partners in New York, New YorkGensler in Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaSam Marshall and NSW Government Architect in Sydney, AustraliaEwingCole in Edgewater, MarylandInteractive Design in Chicago, Illinois

    New York, New York — 2011.0524
    The Whitney Museum of American Art and the City of New York have broken ground for the Whitney's new museum building in the Meatpacking District of Manhattan. Designed by Italian architect Renzo Piano in collaboration with Cooper, Robertson & Partners of New York City, the building will be located on a site acquired from the City of New York at the southern end of the High Line, a park recently created atop a defunct elevated rail line. Creating an asymmetrical form, the upper stories of the building will stretch toward the Hudson River on the west side and step back from the High Line on the east side. A dramatic cantilevered entrance will shelter an 8,500-square-foot (790-square-meter) plaza.

    The new building will include more than 50,000 square feet (4,600 square meters) of indoor galleries, including ground-floor exhibit space that will be accessible free of charge, an expansive column-free gallery for temporary exhibitions, and other spaces. The building will also feature an education center, two theaters, and a ground-level retail shop, along with outdoor exhibition space on a series of rooftops facing the High Line. Targeting LEED Silver certification, the Whitney building is scheduled to open in 2015. Some demolition of existing buildings on the site has already occurred, and more will be performed in summer 2011.

    A special exhibit on the architectural design of the new building, "Designing the Whitney of the Future," runs through early 2012 at the Whitney's current uptown building by Marcel Breuer.

    The Whitney recently announced a multiyear agreement, in principle, with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in which the Met will present exhibitions and educational programming at the Whitney's Breuer-designed building beginning in 2015.   >>>

     
    It's fast, easy, private, and secure.
     

     Tools and Downloads

    Sponsor this ArchWeek special section and build your brand:
     
    Vectorworks Architect 2011
    With Vectorworks(R) Architect 2011 software, you can create building information models without giving up the ease of design you're used to. Whether looking to streamline costs, analyze materials, increase energy efficiency, or just create world-class designs, you can enjoy the capabilities of BIM with great documentation and intelligent tools.  
     
    PassivHaus Design Primer
    Download a basic guide to PassivHaus design, an ultra-low-energy construction standard used in the U.S. and Europe. Through insulation, airtightness, and heat-recovery ventilation, buildings can be designed and built to reduce heating energy needs up to 90 percent compared to the existing building stock, while maintaining high indoor air quality.
     

    I Am Drafter! - Cadalyst, 2011.0527

    Project Vasari Technology Preview 2.0 Now Available - Autodesk Labs Blog, 2011.0526

    Intel Might Make Chips Based on Non-Intel Cores - Reuters, 2011.0526

    Bentley Introduces AECOsim Suite for Building Design - TenLinks, 2011.0526

    VariCAD 2011-1 Released - TenLinks, 2011.0525

    Have the BIM Truth Talk with Your Boss - Cadalyst, 2011.0525

    All Government Projects to Use BIM within Five Years - Building (UK), 2011.0520


     
    New Product

     

    Product News - Pest-Control Insulation

    Pest Control Insulation Systems Inc. manufacturers a patented blown-in cellulose insulation treated with a borate-based pesticide. TAP® (Thermal Acoustical Pest Control) insulation can be installed on top of existing home attic insulation or in the attics and walls of new homes...

     

    See our comprehensive new visual catalog of architectural products, powered by DesignGuide!
     

    ArchitectureWeek Blog Center - latest postings from across the web
    ArchitectureWeek Products Guide - comprehensive and inspiring...
    ArchitectureWeek Jobs Board - List your job openings for free...
    ArchitectureWeek Book Center - 87 architecture-related categories!
     
                               -- * --
    "I enjoyed reading the wonderful description of Ricardo's design of Zocalo in Santa Fe, NM."
      — Don Tishman, developer of Zocalo
     
                 Subscribe today - Save trees now! **
                               -- * --
     

     
    thumbnail

     

    Contents, RSS, and Surface of the Week

    Ancient arcade. Top to bottom: roughly squared stone; diaper brickwork, courses of stone and Roman brick, weathered tile with substructure, brick-and-stone arches, coursed-ashlar stone (WA-286)

     

    Architecture Quiz this week's new question...

    A 2:12 roof slope is how many degrees above horizontal?

     
    Architecture Answer for last week's quiz...

    What is concrete curling and what is the typical cause?


     
    thumbnail

     

    Classic Home 069Five-room brick bungalow by George W. Repp
     
    "An attractive face brick bungalow containing five rooms and bath. The roof of this house should be of masonry- or slate-surfaced shingles. Interesting features of this plan include a fireplace with large inglenook arranged as an extension of the living room. ... "
     

     
    The latest architectural headlines, linking across the Web:
     
    Continuing dimensions...
         Daily Building, Directory of Architects, Architecture Books, 
         Building of the Week, Free Classifieds, Great Buildings, the 
         ArchitectureWeek Online Library, Web Directory, Archiplanet, 
         complete back issues online...
     

    Five years ago in ArchitectureWeek:
       Buenos Aires Row, by Katharine Logan

    Ten years ago in ArchitectureWeek:
       Culture of Listening, by Katharine Logan

     
    For any subscription-related questions, just drop us a line at
    "subscriptions at architectureweek.com".
     
    Disagree, agree, have some to add, or get inspired, with something 
     
    And, as always, please talk back, to "editor@architectureweek.com"!
     
    with best wishes,
     
    Kevin Matthews
    Editor in Chief
     
    Our ten-year anniversary special issue - hundreds of free images...
     
       And Twitter...
    Update your entry in the building industry's hottest wiki.
       Join the free email list for these weekly email Notes.
    Advertise in our weekly newsletters to 125,000 double-opt-in readers!
       Add our rotating Architecture Headlines to your own web site.
    Subscribe and contribute to help support ArchitectureWeek on the Web.
       Suggest a web site to be linked from our free Web Directory.
    Announce New Architectural Products in ArchitectureWeek:
          
    More Newsletters by ArchitectureWeek - subscribe free!
          ArchWeek Green - sustainable design and building news
          ArchWeek Residential - housing news and analysis
     
    ** ArchitectureWeek is a green and low-carbon-footprint 
    publication. By publishing this professional design and building 
    magazine online-only, we save about 48 tons of paper monthly, 
    50 large trees every week, or 2500 trees (a dozen or more acres 
    of mature conifer forest, representing over 100 tons a year of 
    biological carbon sequestration) each year, compared to reaching 
    a similar readership on paper - not counting these newsletters!  
    We provide ongoing pro-bono services to local non-profit 
    sustainability organizations, and our company offices are powered 
    by a green mix of 98% wind energy and 2% solar power through our 
    local electric utilities.
     
        Reduce your carbon footprint...  Switch those old paper-based
        monthly subscriptions - and read ArchitectureWeek online!
     
        ArchitectureWeek      ...the new world of design and building

        The leading professional architecture magazine online, with 
        beautiful photos, detailed drawings, and compelling stories
        delivered 47 times a year to 400,000 monthly visitors.  
     
        The largest audience reach for a professional architecture 
        periodical in the English language.
     
        Flagship of the Artifice group of architecture sites - two 
        million monthly unique design and building-related visitors - 
        foundation of the Artifice transformational communications 
        network with six million monthly unique visitors overall.

        The way of architecture...                      Artifice, Inc.


       541-345-7421 vox . 541-345-7438 fax . 800-203-8324 USA toll free

       Artifice.  "1534. [a. F., ad. L. artificium]  1. The action of an
      artificer, construction, workmanship.  2. The product of art.  3.
      Mode or style of workmanship.  4. Constructive skill.  5. Human
      skill.  6. Skill in expedients.  7. An ingenious expedient." 
                     -- The Oxford Universal Dictionary, Third Edition 

        Please add "editor@architectureweek.com" to your address book  
        to help ensure successful delivery of these newsletters.
         
        Newsletter archive for ArchitectureWeek Notes No. 490 and earlier.
     
    + - - Copyright (c) 2011 Artifice, Inc. - All Rights Reserved. - - +
     Click Forward in your email -- Share ArchWeek Notes with a friend!
     


     


    Architecture News   by ArchitectureWeek

    Daily Architecture Headlines — Updated every day at ArchitectureWeek

    News Department Archive

    Special thanks to our Sustaining Subscribers.

     
       
    NEXT WEEK

    Send this to a friend       Media Kit       Subscribe       Contribute       Privacy       Comments

    ARCHWEEK   |   GREAT BUILDINGS   |   ARCHIPLANET   |   DISCUSSION   |   ARTICLES   |   BLOGS   |   SEARCH
    http://www.ArchitectureWeek.com
    © 2000-2011 Artifice, Inc. - All Rights Reserved