ArchitectureWeek - Dimensions
HOME   |   DESIGN   |   PEOPLE & PLACES   |   CONTEXT   |   CULTURE   |   TECHNOLOGY   |   SEARCH

Topics Index
Architects Index
Authors Index

ArchitectureWeek Notes
  •  Notes No. 581
  •  Notes No. 580
  •  Notes No. 579
  •  Notes No. 578
  •  Notes No. 577
  •  Notes No. 576
  •  Notes No. 575
  •  Notes No. 574
  •  Notes No. 573
  •  Notes No. 572
  •  Notes No. 571
  •  Notes No. 570
  •  Notes No. 569
  •  Notes No. 568
  •  Notes No. 567
  •  Notes No. 566
  •  Notes No. 565
  •  Notes No. 564
  •  Notes No. 563
  •  Notes No. 562
  •  Notes No. 561
  •  Notes No. 560
  •  Notes No. 559
  •  Notes No. 558
  •  Notes No. 557
  •  Notes No. 556
  •  Notes No. 555
  •  Notes No. 554
  •  Notes No. 553
  •  Notes No. 552
  •  Notes No. 551
  •  Notes No. 550
  •  Notes No. 549
  •  Notes No. 548
  •  Notes No. 547
  •  Notes No. 546
  •  Notes No. 545
  •  Notes No. 544
  •  Notes No. 543
  •  Notes No. 541
  •  Notes No. 540
  •  Notes No. 539
  •  Notes No. 538
  •  Notes No. 537
  •  Notes No. 536
  •  Notes No. 535
  •  Notes No. 534
  •  Notes No. 533
  •  Notes No. 532
  •  Notes No. 531
  •  Notes No. 530
  •  Notes No. 529
  •  Notes No. 528
  •  Notes No. 527
  •  Notes No. 526
  •  Notes No. 525
  •  Notes No. 524
  •  Notes No. 523
  •  Notes No. 522
  •  Notes No. 521
  •  Notes No. 520
  •  Notes No. 519
  •  Notes No. 518
  •  Notes No. 517
  •  Notes No. 516
  •  Notes No. 515
  •  Notes No. 514
  •  Notes No. 513
  •  Notes No. 512
  •  Notes No. 511
  •  Notes No. 510
  •  Notes No. 509
  •  Notes No. 508
  •  Notes No. 507
  •  Notes No. 506
  •  Notes No. 505
  •  Notes No. 504
  •  Notes No. 503
  •  Notes No. 502
  •  Notes No. 501
  •  Notes No. 500
  •  Notes No. 499
  •  Notes No. 498
  •  Notes No. 497
  •  Notes No. 496
  •  Notes No. 495
  •  Notes No. 494
  •  Notes No. 493
  •  Notes No. 492
  •  Notes No. 491
  •  Notes No. 490
        and Before

    ArchWeek Notes
    ArchWeek Green
    ArchWeek Residential
    Subscribe Free

  •  
    IN THIS ISSUE
     Contents/RSS
    Design
    Urban Infill Prefab
    Design
    Staying Put - Creating A Cook's Kitchen
    Culture
    "The Store Problem"

     
    [an error occurred while processing this directive]
     
    AND MORE
      Current Contents
      Blog Center
      Download Center
      New Products
      Products Guide
      Classic Home
      Architecture Forum
      Architects Directory
      Topics Library
      Complete Archive
      Web Directory
      About ArchWeek
      Search
      Subscribe & Contribute
      Free Newsletters
       

     
    QUIZ

     
    ArchitectureWeek Notes No. 508
    Dear ArchitectureWeek Readers,

    ArchitectureWeek No. 508 is now available on the Web, with these new design and building features, and more. This Notes edition is sponsored by TXI Expanded Shale & Clay:

    TXI

    TXI ES&C - Children's Hospital of Orange County

    TXI Expanded Shale & Clay partnered with Catalina Pacific Concrete to provide lightweight aggregate concrete for the new Children's Hospital of Orange County Patient Tower.

    Learn more about the project

     
     
    thumbnail

    One Jackson Square, by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, in the Greenwich Village Historic District. Photo: Michael Moran

    NATIONAL AIA AWARDS
    by ArchitectureWeek

    On a corner site in Manhattan, within the Greenwich Village Historic District, stands a new 11-story apartment building wrapped in ribbons of glass. The faceted, undulating facade creates a lively contemporary foil to the neighboring masonry structures while reflecting their facades and the greenery of Jackson Square Park.

    Designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, this building is one of 27 projects honored by the American Institute of Architects in its AIA Institute Honor Awards for 2011.

    One Jackson Square occupies a six-sided site that had served as a surface parking lot since subway construction in the 1920s. Located at the convergence of two street grids and spanning two zoning districts, the 30-unit, high-end residential building steps up from seven to 11 stories, south to north.

    To allow the curtain wall to follow a unique rippling path at each floor, a split horizontal joint was used at each spandrel location. Varied-width glazed panels form facets in the enclosure, approximating each floor slab's irregular curves. The result is a complex facade that engages in an animated dialogue with its urban surroundings.

    The serpentine street wall of glass is continuous with the lobby's similarly sculptural walls of bamboo plywood. The rest of the ground floor is slated for retail. Above, the building contains a mix of apartments: one-, two-, and three-bedroom units in the lower floors, two-story duplex and terrace units above, and, in the tower, the most-spacious units.  >>>

     

     
    thumbnail

    TWA Terminal at Idlewild (now JFK) Airport, Eero Saarinen, New York, NY (1962). Photo: © Ezra Stoller/ Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery

     

    Ezra Stoller
    by Michael J. Crosbie

    Many of the finest examples of Modern architecture from the late 1940s to the late 1970s were "made" by a master — not necessarily the architect, but the man who captured the essence of Modern architecture through the lens of his large-format camera: Ezra Stoller.

    Most of us "know" a building from its photographs — it's only after we see the iconic images that we venture to see the real thing. But the images shape our expectations of and our prejudices and passion for the architectural work. We might even try to snap it in the same way as a master photographer such as Stoller.

    And for those great works of architecture that we have yet to visit in person, or that have been lost to time, the iconic image is all we have.   >>>

     
    It's fast, easy, private, and secure.
     

     Tools and Downloads

    Sponsor this ArchWeek special section and build your brand:
     
    Vectorworks Architect 2011
    With Vectorworks(R) Architect 2011 software, you can create building information models without giving up the ease of design you're used to. Whether looking to streamline costs, analyze materials, increase energy efficiency, or just create world-class designs, you can enjoy the capabilities of BIM with great documentation and intelligent tools.
     
    White Paper on Anchoring Dimension Stone
    Download a general guide from the Marble Institute of America for tradespeople on the practice of mechanically anchoring dimension stone, offering insight about how stone-anchorage devices interface with stone panels and the building structure. The bulletin also discusses common anchorage devices and gives guidance on appropriate anchor devices in different situations.  
     

    Getting Up to Speed in 3D - Cadalyst, 2011.0223

    Finding Discrepancies between BIM Models and Contract Documents Using Newforma Project Center - AECbytes, 2011.0223

    Autodesk UK Offers Up to 40% Discounts on AutoCAD LT 2011 - TenLinks, 2011.0223

    Just How 3D Are We? Part 1 - Cadalyst, 2011.0223

    Pump Up the Performance of Your Old Laptop - Cadalyst, 2011.0223

    New Hacking Tools Pose Bigger Threats to Wi-Fi Users - New York Times, 2011.0217


     
    thumbnail

     

    Product News - Double-Sided Acid-Etched Glass from Walker Glass

    The current double-sided acid-etched glass program from Walker Glass includes the Satin/ Satin and Opaque/ Opaque finishes. With the new addition of Velour/ Velour, Walker now offers no fewer than six different shades of full-surface etching.

     

    See our comprehensive new visual catalog of architectural products, powered by DesignGuide!
     

    ArchitectureWeek Blog Center - latest postings from across the web
    ArchitectureWeek Products Guide - comprehensive and inspiring...
    ArchitectureWeek Jobs Board - List your job openings for free...
    ArchitectureWeek Book Center - 87 architecture-related categories!
     
                               -- * --
    "Love your work!! Keep it up!"                  — PG, Thirroul, Australia
     
                 Subscribe today - Save trees now! **
                               -- * --
     

     
    thumbnail

     

    Contents, RSS, and Surface of the Week

    Wood siding with industrial sash (WA-052)

     

    Architecture Quiz this week's new question...

    The "Clerk of the Works" on your project is not sure who typically purchases the "Builder's Risk Insurance." Between the Owner, Architect, and Contractor, who does the Clerk of the Works work for, and who typically purchases Builder's Risk Insurance?

     
    Architecture Answer for last week's quiz...

    Churrigueresque is which of the following:

    A. Lavishly decorated type of Spanish architecture.

    B. A term coined by a modern architectural historian to describe overly ornate Italian church interiors.

    C. A type of Mexican salsa named after the famous plaza in Churrigueres, in southern Mexico.


     
    thumbnail

     

    Classic Home 023Half-timbered English house by Frederick L. Ackerman
     
    "The steep roof, grouped casements, and tiled chimneys are characteristic of the type. The huge sun parlor at the side is an American idea which has been cleverly handled. "
     

     
    The latest architectural headlines, linking across the Web:
     
    Continuing dimensions...
         Daily Building, Directory of Architects, Architecture Books, 
         Building of the Week, Free Classifieds, Great Buildings, the 
         ArchitectureWeek Online Library, Web Directory, Archiplanet, 
         complete back issues online...
     

    Five years ago in ArchitectureWeek:
       Madrid Takes Flight, by Rachel Grossman

    Ten years ago in ArchitectureWeek:
       Foster and Partners Roof the Great Court, by Don Barker

     
    For any subscription-related questions, just drop us a line at
    "subscriptions at architectureweek.com".
     
    Disagree, agree, have some to add, or get inspired, with something 
     
    And, as always, please talk back, to "editor@architectureweek.com"!
     
    with best wishes,
     
    Kevin Matthews
    Editor in Chief
     
    Our ten-year anniversary special issue - hundreds of free images...
     
       And Twitter...
    Update your entry in the building industry's hottest wiki.
       Join the free email list for these weekly email Notes.
    Advertise in our weekly newsletters to 125,000 double-opt-in readers!
       Add our rotating Architecture Headlines to your own web site.
    Subscribe and contribute to help support ArchitectureWeek on the Web.
       Suggest a web site to be linked from our free Web Directory.
    Announce New Architectural Products in ArchitectureWeek:
          
    More Newsletters by ArchitectureWeek - subscribe free!
          ArchWeek Green - sustainable design and building news
          ArchWeek Residential - housing news and analysis
     
    ** ArchitectureWeek is a green and low-carbon-footprint 
    publication. By publishing this professional design and building 
    magazine online-only, we save about 48 tons of paper monthly, 
    50 large trees every week, or 2500 trees (a dozen or more acres 
    of mature conifer forest, representing over 100 tons a year of 
    biological carbon sequestration) each year, compared to reaching 
    a similar readership on paper - not counting these newsletters!  
    We provide ongoing pro-bono services to local non-profit 
    sustainability organizations, and our company offices are powered 
    by a green mix of 98% wind energy and 2% solar power through our 
    local electric utilities.
     
        Reduce your carbon footprint...  Switch those old paper-based
        monthly subscriptions - and read ArchitectureWeek online!
     
        ArchitectureWeek      ...the new world of design and building

        The leading professional architecture magazine online, with 
        beautiful photos, detailed drawings, and compelling stories
        delivered 47 times a year to 400,000 monthly visitors.  
     
        The largest audience reach for a professional architecture 
        periodical in the English language.
     
        Flagship of the Artifice group of architecture sites - two 
        million monthly unique design and building-related visitors - 
        foundation of the Artifice transformational communications 
        network with six million monthly unique visitors overall.

        The way of architecture...                      Artifice, Inc.


       541-345-7421 vox . 541-345-7438 fax . 800-203-8324 USA toll free

       Artifice.  "1534. [a. F., ad. L. artificium]  1. The action of an
      artificer, construction, workmanship.  2. The product of art.  3.
      Mode or style of workmanship.  4. Constructive skill.  5. Human
      skill.  6. Skill in expedients.  7. An ingenious expedient." 
                     -- The Oxford Universal Dictionary, Third Edition 

        Please add "editor@architectureweek.com" to your address book  
        to help ensure successful delivery of these newsletters.
         
        Newsletter archive for ArchitectureWeek Notes No. 490 and earlier.
     
    + - - Copyright (c) 2011 Artifice, Inc. - All Rights Reserved. - - +
     Click Forward in your email -- Share ArchWeek Notes with a friend!
     





    Architecture News   by ArchitectureWeek

    Daily Architecture Headlines — Updated every day at ArchitectureWeek

    News Department Archive

    Special thanks to our Sustaining Subscribers.

     
       
    NEXT WEEK

    Send this to a friend       Media Kit       Subscribe       Contribute       Privacy       Comments

    ARCHWEEK   |   GREAT BUILDINGS   |   ARCHIPLANET   |   DISCUSSION   |   ARTICLES   |   BLOGS   |   SEARCH
    http://www.ArchitectureWeek.com
    © 2000-2011 Artifice, Inc. - All Rights Reserved