Page C1.3 . 14 November 2012   
ArchitectureWeek - Culture Department
< Prev Page Next Page >
 

 

 
QUIZ

Inside the Tipi with Roland Reed

continued

 

ArchWeek Image

Into the Wilderness, 1912
Photo: Roland Reed Extra Large Image

 

ArchWeek Image

Untitled.
Photo: Roland Reed Extra Large Image

ArchWeek Image
SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

Encampment of Chief Two Guns White Calf
Photo: Roland Reed Extra Large Image

 

ArchWeek Image
SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

Pow Wow
Photo: Roland Reed Extra Large Image

ArchWeek Image
SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

Blood Circle Camp, Alberta, Canada. Along with many regular tipis, the Buffalo Women's Society Lodge is seen on the right, and the Horn Society Lodge is the large tipi just left of center. Some rectangular tents are also visible behind the circle.
Photo: Roland Reed Extra Large Image

 

ArchWeek Image

Piegan Camp, Montana. Camp life was central to the Blackfeet. Beyond family, the basic social unit was the band. A band was normally comprised of between eighty and two hundred people living in a village of ten to thirty lodges or tipis, located near a river or lake. Generally these were arranged in a circle with the chief or leader located in the center.
Photo: Roland Reed Extra Large Image

ArchWeek Image

The Buffalo Women's Society Lodge, enlarged from Blood Circle Camp above, was a large structure, made up from typical tipi components.
Photo: Roland Reed Extra Large Image

 

ArchWeek Image
SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

Medicine Lodge in Winter, 1912. This photograph shows the interior of a lodge, somewhat similar to the Buffalo Women's Society Lodge.
Photo: Roland Reed Extra Large Image

ArchWeek Image

At the Spring, 1908. She-Who-Travels-in-the-Sky, an Ojibwe, uses a birchbark scoop to fill a large birchbark water carrier.
Photo: Roland Reed Extra Large Image

 

ArchWeek Image
SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

The Colors, 1907. The birchbark wigwam, used by forest-dwelling Ojibwe, was also demountable and transportable, though not as mobile as the tipi.
Photo: Roland Reed Extra Large Image

 

Click on thumbnail images
to view full-size pictures.

Discuss this article in the Architecture Forum...

  Comments  

This article is excerpted and adapted from Alone with the Past: The Life and Photographic Art of Roland W. Reed by Ernest R. Lawrence, with a preface by Joe D. Horse Capture, copyright © 2012, with permission of the publisher, Afton Press.

AW

 
< Prev Page Next Page > Send this to a friend       Subscribe       Free Newsletters       Media Kit       Privacy       Feedback       Twitter       Facebook
ARCHWEEK  |  GREAT BUILDINGS  |  ARCHIPLANET  |  DISCUSSION  |  BOOKS  |  BLOGS  |  SEARCH
  ArchitectureWeek.com © 2012 Artifice, Inc. - All Rights Reserved