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    QUIZ

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    A Kennedy Center Image Gallery

    by ArchitectureWeek

    ArchWeek Image


    Photo: Kevin Matthews/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image

    The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts by Edward Durell Stone is a major architectural and cultural landmark on the banks of the Potomac in Washington, D.C., as well as a white marble living memorial to the Camelot President.

    With the publication of a major Edward Durell Stone monograph, written with remarkable perspective by Stone's son, it seems an opportune time to reconsider the body of work produced by one of the more enigmatic American modernists.

    One of Stone's most significant works is the national cultural center of the United States, the creation of which is addressed in the cover story of this ArchitectureWeek issue.

    We hope this extended collection of photographs, supporting that story, will contribute to appreciation of the building, which we find to be most appropriate to its site — extremely difficult, yet handled with such grace as to seem inevitable; to its cultural station — demanding both grandeur and universality, with dignity yet without adding airs; and to its programmatic mission, for which numerous technical issues, from services to acoustics, have been handled with relatively transparent success.   >>>


    ArchWeek Image

    Looking south at the front colonnade of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Lincoln Memorial, at the west end of the National Mall, is just visible (on the skyline in this photo, just to the right of the flag poles).
    Photo: Kevin Matthews/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image


    ArchWeek Image

    At night, the Kennedy Center is a lantern on the riverside.
    Photo: Kevin Matthews/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image

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    Photo: Kevin Matthews/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image

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    Photo: Kevin Matthews/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image

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    Photo: Kevin Matthews/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image

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    Photo: Kevin Matthews/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image

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    A certain formal resonance between the Kennedy Center and the 1914 to 1922 Lincoln Memorial — which share general massing, as well as a base, cornice, columns and attic development, despite contrasting stylistic language — lends a degree of formal harmony along the river.
    Photo: Kevin Matthews/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image

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    Despite the challenging location, pedestrian and vehicle drop-off approaches are arranged to provide graceful views of the building.
    Photo: Kevin Matthews/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image

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    Photo: Kevin Matthews/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image

     

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