Page C1.3 . 01 February 2012                     
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    Oscar Niemeyer - Brazilian Modernist

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    Completed in 1996, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Niterói, Brazil, is a cantilevered, circular building that stands on a coastal promontory. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Rodrigo Soldon Extra Large Image

     

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    A swirling, red-painted ramp leads visitors up to the main entrance of the Museum of Contemporary Art, one floor above ground. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Rodrigo Soldon Extra Large Image

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    Inside the Museum of Contemporary Art, a ribbon of glazing offers panoramic views of the city, water, and land beyond. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Vincent Howard Extra Large Image

     

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    Kenzo Tange, born in 1913, and Eero Saarinen, born in 1910, were both contemporaries of Oscar Niemeyer, born 1907. Tange's Yamanashi Press and Broadcasting Center (1966), in Yamanashi, Japan, expresses its concrete proudly, as do various works by Niemeyer and Saarinen.
    Photo: Photo: Shinkenchiku-sha/ Courtesy DAAS Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image

    Eero Saarinen designed in lyrical curves, as well as other forms of structural discipline, with a range of expression we can relate to the works of Niemeyer and Tange. This is a perspective sketch of Saarinen's 1956 design for the hockey rink at Yale University.
    Image: Eero Saarinen/ Courtesy Yale University Manuscripts and Archives Extra Large Image

     

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    Japanese architect Kenzo Tange also worked in curves at times, including this Olympic arena (1964) in Tokyo, Japan. Taken together, the work of these three contemporaries may be ssen to span rather similar, even while wide-ranging concerns and expressions. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Flickr user Kanegen Extra Large Image

     

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