Answers . 25 January 2012                     
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    NEXT WEEK

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    Quizzical Pursuit
    —The Architecture Puzzler

    Created by Dave Guadagni

    Solution to Last Week's Puzzler
    Architecture Puzzler #546

    Question

    Are you likely to get stronger concrete (at 28 days and later) from concrete poured during hot or cold weather?

    Answer

    Concrete poured during cold weather has slower strength gain (during the first few days after the pour) but usually higher ultimate strength than warm-weather concrete. This is because of the improved quality of the hardened cement paste formed more slowly under cooler conditions. Note, however, that early freezing must be prevented.
     


     

    Okay, got it? Now try this week's Puzzler:

    http://www.ArchitectureWeek.com/quiz.html


     

    Dave Guadagni, AIA, is an architect with Robertson/Sherwood/Architects

    Quizzical Pursuit is Copyright 2012, Dave Guadagni.

    AW

    ArchWeek Image

    Lots of concrete was used in building the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, Connecticut, designed by Louis Kahn.
    Photo: Jan Martin

     
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