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    2011 Stirling Prize Shortlist

    by ArchitectureWeek

    The Stirling Prize for 2011 goes to Evelyn Grace Academy by Zaha Hadid Architects, chosen from a shortlist of six outstanding projects. In this article, ArchitectureWeek documents the five outstanding projects that were shortlisted but didn't get the Stirling Prize, with commentary from the RIBA jury.

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    Project   Velodrome
    Location   London, England, UK
    Architect   Hopkins Architects
    Client   Olympic Delivery Authority
    Contractor   ISG
    Services Engineer   BDSP
    Contract Value   Confidential
    Date of Completion   January 2011
    Gross Internal Area   21,700 square meters (234,000 square feet)

    The Velodrome is one of four permanent venues at London's Olympic Park. Designed to host indoor cycling events for the 2012 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games, the venue will also provide continuing public functions after the games, with minimal transformation.

    Deriving its form from the track itself, the sweeping building comprises three main elements: the roof, the concourse, and the plinth. The glazed concourse separates the curve of the wood-clad roof soffit from the concrete and landscaping of the plinth.

    Internally the material palette is carefully controlled; fine cast-in-place concrete abounds. The material and visual emphasis is on the beauty and color of the timber track.

    The arena is surprisingly intimate for a 6,000-seat venue, with the cable-net roof sitting low over the bowl. No seat is very far from the track.

    The building is a consummate exercise in a simple idea beautifully and efficiently carried out.

    Project   An Gaeláras Cultúrlann Uí Chanáin
    Location   Derry, Northern Ireland, UK
    Architect   O'Donnell + Tuomey
    Client   An Gaeláras
    Contractor   JPM Contracts
    Contract Value   £2.8 million
    Date of Completion   September 2009
    Gross Internal Area   1,980 square meters (21,300 square feet)

    Cultúrlann Uí Chanáin is a cultural center designed to promote the use and enjoyment of the Irish language (Gaelic).

    Faced with a formidable infill site — only one of the four sides could have windows — in a street of Georgian and Victorian row houses, and further compromised by a substation that occupies a third of the frontage, the architects came up with vortex-like plan that draws the visitor into and up the resulting dynamic multilevel building. They have also managed to house the center's varied functions in spaces with adequate light and views.

    Lots of architects talk about creating "streets," but this building really has one. Toplit by a large, steeply sloping skylight, the cranked space transports the visitor as if to a twisting medieval lane, lined with shops, cafes, and bars, leading to a theater.

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    Above, teaching and office spaces are linked by a series of stairs, bridges, and platforms that circle and cross the internal courtyard. The stairs appear and disappear as the route unfolds, enticing visitors to explore. The plan appears haphazard, but in fact it fixes places and connections.

    In scale, the building respects its neighbors, while its beautiful board-formed concrete contributes to its sculptural qualities.

    Project   Renovation of the Angel Building
    Location   London, England, UK
    Architect   Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM)
    Client   Derwent London
    Contractor   BAM Construction
    Structural Engineer   Adams Kara Taylor
    Services Engineer   Norman Disney & Young
    Contract Value   £72 million
    Date of Completion   October 2010
    Gross Internal Area   33,220 square meters (357,600 square feet)

    AHMM designed the transformation of the Angel Building, imbuing an unremarkable 1980s commercial building with elegance and poise. ArchitectureWeek previously covered the project's completion in People and Places 2011.0302.

    This speculative office building is located at a historic focal point in the London borough of Islington. The renovation project retained the original concrete structure while infilling an old courtyard and adding new office girth around its perimeter. This intervention and others increased leasable space from about 15,000 square meters to 25,000 (from 160,000 to 270,000 square feet).   >>>

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    The Velodrome in London, England, was designed by Hopkins Architects for the 2012 Summer Olympic Games.
    Photo: © Anthony Palmer/ ODA Extra Large Image

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    The shape of the Velodrome's roof echoes the cycling track inside.
    Photo: © David Poultney Extra Large Image

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    The Velodrome features a prominent wood soffit that rests upon a relatively modest glass curtain wall.
    Photo: Richard Davies Extra Large Image

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    The UK Olympic cycling team rode on the Velodrome track on its opening day.
    Photo: © Martin Keogh Extra Large Image

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    Located in Derry, Northern Ireland, and designed by the Irish firm O'Donnell + Tuomey, An Galáeras Cultúrlann Uí Chanáin is a cultural center focused on the Irish language.
    Photo: Dennis Gilbert/ VIEW Extra Large Image

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    A sawtooth skylight illuminates the irregularly shaped central atrium of Cultúrlann Uí Chanáin.
    Photo: Dennis Gilbert/ VIEW Extra Large Image

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    Red-oxide paint is used to highlight walkways and stairs in Cultúrlann Uí Chanáin.
    Photo: Dennis Gilbert/ VIEW Extra Large Image

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    Besides the red, other colorful highlights offset the gray béton brut concrete that dominates the interior of Cultúrlann Uí Chanáin.
    Photo: Dennis Gilbert/ VIEW Extra Large Image

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    Allford Hall Monaghan Morris designed the renovation and expansion of the Angel Building, a 1980s office building in London that now includes a curved, glass-and-metal-gridded front facade.
    Photo: © Timothy Soar Extra Large Image

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    Ground-floor plan drawing of the Angel Building.
    Image: © AHMM Extra Large Image

     

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