Page C1.1 . 07 September 2011                     
ArchitectureWeek - Culture Department
NEWS   |   DESIGN   |   BUILDING   |   DESIGN TOOLS   |   ENVIRONMENT   |   CULTURE   |   PRODUCTS
< Prev Page Next Page >
 
CULTURE
 
  •  
  • World Trade Center - Tenth Anniversary
     
  •  
  • Maison Carré by Alvar Aalto
     
  •  
  • Design by Arts Corporation
     
  •  
  • HS#9 by Coop Himmelb(l)au
     
  •  
  • Breuer's Whitney Museum

     
    AND MORE
      Current Contents
      People & Places
      Blog Center
      Book Center
      Download Center
      New Products
      Products Guide
      Classic Home
      Calendar
      Competitions
      Conferences
      Events & Exhibits
      Architecture Forum
      Architects Directory
      Topics Library
      Complete Archive
      Web Directory
      About ArchWeek
      Search
      Subscribe & Contribute
      Free Newsletters
       

     
    QUIZ

    World Trade Center - Tenth Anniversary

    by ArchitectureWeek

    The slogan was "Never Forget."

    Few of us have.

    As part of our remembrance of the disasters on September 11, 2001, at the World Trade Center in New York, at The Pentagon in Washington, D.C., and in the Pennsylvania countryside, here is a selection of related stories from the last ten years of ArchitectureWeek, in addition to our current coverage.

    Each represents just a glimpse into the full living history of sudden terror, great loss, and slowly ongoing recovery.

    —The Editors


     
    ArchWeek Image

    7 WORLD TRADE CENTER

    Seven World Trade Center was the third building to collapse on September 11, 2001, and it is the first to be rebuilt. Designed by David Childs of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM), the new building is composed of 42 floors of office space set above eight floors of Con Edison transformers (located in large concrete vaults at street level). — Published 2009.0603

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    FIVE YEARS LATER

    We bear witness this week both to an international tragedy and to the largest architectural disaster in U.S. history. Five years ago, two of our largest buildings were utterly and unexpectedly destroyed, killing thousands of people who were unable to escape them. On this anniversary, as people around the world can still feel the ground reverberating, let us pause in remembrance. — Published 2006.0913

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    MODELING LIBESKIND'S WTC

    Like other contemporary architects, Daniel Libeskind — designer of the new World Trade Center — and his firm use computer-aided modeling tools extensively during schematic design. But the firm also relies on physical models. As the new World Trade Center design develops in the public limelight, a look back at its schematic beginnings reveals a process in which physical and computer models evolved in parallel. — Published 2004.0303

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    RECONSTRUCTION COMPLICATIONS CONTINUE

    When architect Daniel Libeskind was chosen in February 2003 to redesign New York's World Trade Center site, it appeared to be an irrevocable decision about the fate of "Ground Zero." But controversies have persisted, and what finally gets built may be very different from Libeskind's original design vision. — Published 2003.0827

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    ENGINEERING REPORT ON PENTAGON DISASTER

    When the Pentagon in Washington D.C. was hit by a hijacked plane on September 11, 2001, the damage and the loss of life were appalling. But the destruction was less severe than might have been expected from such an impact. About 20,000 people were at work in the U.S. Department of Defense headquarters, the largest office building in the world. Yet according to casualty reports, only 125 Pentagon employees were killed along with the 64 from the ill-fated airliner. — Published 2003.0212

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    LIBESKIND SCHEME CHOSEN FOR WTC

    On February 27, 2003, the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation (LMDC) selected Studio Daniel Libeskind and their widely-applauded design to guide the reconstruction of the World Trade Center site in New York. The "Memory Foundations" submission by the Polish-American architect emerged from a competition lasting many months, involving some of the best known architects in the world, and inspiring a lively, often rancorous, public debate. Although the debating is far from over, there now appears to be a framework from which to develop a long-term reconstruction plan. — Published 2003.0305

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    ANNIVERSARY OF DISASTER

    As the first anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center site approached, the air in New York was strangely expectant. Hot, balmy days recalled the weather of September 2001, as if inaugurating a season of remembrance. — Published 2002.0911

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    PENTAGON REBUILT!

    One year after a highjacked airliner smashed through the limestone and concrete facade of the Pentagon, reconstruction of the damaged portions of the building will be complete. When the airliner exploded inside the headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense, 189 people, both military and civilian, were killed. As a tribute to the victims, and in defiance of the terrorists, construction crews have been engaged in a nearly 24-hour-per-day effort to rebuild and repair the extensive damage. — Published 2002.0904

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    WORLD TRADE CENTER PLANNING UNCERTAIN

    At a public meeting on July 16, 2002, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation (LMDC) unveiled six concept plans for redeveloping the site of the World Trade Center. This first phase of what seems headed toward a lengthy, contentious process was prepared by the New York architecture firm of Beyer Blinder Belle, Architects & Planners. All six proposed options include a permanent memorial, public open space, buildings to replace the destroyed office, hotel, and retail space, a regional transportation hub, and cultural and civic institutions. — Published 2002.0807

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    ENGINEERS EXPLAIN WTC COLLAPSE

    After seven months of wide speculation about the causes of New York's World Trade Center collapses on September 11, 2001, a report has been issued based on physical evidence and a thorough engineering analysis. — Published 2002.0515

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    EARLY DAYS AT THE DISASTER

    Like hundreds of other volunteers, I spent most of the week of September 11 at the site of the former World Trade Center, helping with rescue efforts as best I could. My particular background lent insight to some of the problems we faced. — Published 2001.1107

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    COLLISION IN NEW YORK, 1945

    It's been said that the World Trade Center Towers, tragically destroyed on Spetember 11, 2001, were designed to withstand the impact of a speeding jet airplane. Why would architects and engineers in the 1960s take such an unlikely event into account for their design requirements? — Published 2001.1031

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    ENGINEERING FORENSICS OF COLLAPSE

    Behind the slowly shrinking heaps of rubble in lower Manhattan and Arlington, Virginia, a phalanx of forensic engineers, supported by a variety of research grants, is working against the flow of debris as it is carted off to recycling sites and landfills, searching for clues about how three of the largest U.S. buildings were mortally wounded. — Published 2001.1017

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    PENTAGON BATTERED BUT FIRM

    On September 11, when an American Airlines Boeing 757 crashed into the Pentagon, home of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), about 20,000 people were at work in this, the largest office building in the world. Yet according to the DoD casualty update on October 1, only 125 Pentagon employees were killed along with the 64 from the fated airliner. — Published 2001.1003

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    REBUILDING IN NEW YORK

    It has been just over two weeks since terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center led to the collapse of the landmark twin towers. To varying degrees, and for those who can manage it, the routines of Manhattan have restarted. The city, in its myriad ways, is going about the work of going back to work. — Published 2001.0926

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    BEYOND DISASTER

    In our second week since the terrorist disaster in New York, Washington, and Pennsylvania, emergency crews continue to work on rescue and recovery, families, friends, a nation, and the world mourn their losses, and most of the U.S. struggles toward normalcy in our daily lives. — Published 2001.0919

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Image

    WORLD TRADE CENTER DESTROYED

    On Tuesday, September 11, 2001, the world was shocked by horrific attacks on the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York and by the related attack on the Pentagon in Washington D.C. ArchitectureWeek joins the world in profound sympathy for the victims and their families. — Published 2001.0912

    Continue...

     
    < Prev Page Next Page > Send this to a friend       Subscribe       Contribute       Media Kit       Privacy       Comments
    ARCHWEEK  |  GREAT BUILDINGS  |  ARCHIPLANET  |  DISCUSSION  |  BOOKS  |  BLOGS  |  SEARCH
      ArchitectureWeek.com © 2011 Artifice, Inc. - All Rights Reserved