Page N4.2 . 27 April 2011                     
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    AIA Housing Awards: Multifamily

    continued

    Simple materials and straightforward construction helped keep costs low: the condominium building at 1111 East Pike Street was built for $169 per square foot ($1,820 per square meter).

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    Mixed Uses in West Hollywood

    To provide public parking in a mixed-use project that reinforces the pedestrian-oriented streetscape — that was the charge for Koning Eizenberg Architecture and developer CIM Group, LLC in creating the Hancock Lofts mixed-use project in West Hollywood, California.

    Seeking to increase parking availability for restaurants and retail shops in the vicinity, the City of West Hollywood selected the developer-architect team to redevelop the site of a former Pacific Bell warehouse facility and surface parking lot, with the architect leading a community design process.

    The resulting four-story-tall building tucks two levels of public parking (156 spaces) largely below grade, with parking for the building's residents (61 spaces) stacked in two levels above it. At grade, retail space and seven affordable studio units define the street edge along bustling Santa Monica Boulevard and Hancock Avenue, with 31 single-story and townhouse-style condominium units above.

    Sliding wood screens on the flats minimize heat gain and give residents control over the degree of privacy from the busy street below. Wood louvers also screen the second-story residential parking from Hancock Avenue, while the townhouses and their private courtyards provide some transition of scale to the hillside neighborhood beyond.

    Salem Rejuvenation

    As the 21st century dawned, the jail at 50 St. Peter Street in downtown Salem, Massachusetts, stood abandoned. The former Essex County Jail had begun operation during the War of 1812, been declared unfit by a federal judge in 1991, and been partly damaged by fire in 1999. Located in the Salem Common Historic District, the complex comprised an original granite jail building (1813), a major brick addition (1884) by Gridley J.F. Bryant, a brick jail keeper's house (1813) attributed to Samuel McIntire, and a clapboard carriage house (circa 1815).

    Finegold Alexander + Associates designed an adaptive reuse of the historic complex, converting it to house 23 residential units and a restaurant. In the 1813/1884 jail building, an ornamental stair was saved, but the jail cells were removed and replaced by steel supports, making way for apartments with high ceilings, 14-foot- (4.3-meter-) tall windows, and walls of exposed granite and brick. Remnants of the building's previous use include cell doors mounted in corridors, and a public history exhibit in two jail cells.

    At the fire-damaged jail keeper's house, the charred wood portico and pediment were replicated, and contemporary interiors were installed. The dilapidated carriage house was demolished and replaced with a new two-story, 1,350-square-foot (125-square-meter) building containing a single two-bedroom unit. The other dwelling units are also mostly two-bedroom, ranging from 800 to 2,600 square feet (75 to 240 square meters). One affordable unit is designated an artist live/work space.

    New Boston Ventures had initially planned to convert the complex into high-end condominiums, but switched strategies in 2008 due to the recession. By developing the project as rental apartments, the owner-developer secured state and federal historic tax credits, and has the option to convert the units to condos after five years.   >>>

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    A sliding wall panel serves as a flexible divider in the units of 1111 East Pike, separating the main living space from the adjacent kitchen and bedroom areas.
    Photo: © Francis Zera Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image
    SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

    Koning Eizenberg Architecture designed the Hancock Lofts, a four-story mixed-use development in West Hollywood, California.
    Photo: © Eric Staudenmaier Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image

    Hancock Lofts section-perspective rendering.
    Image: Koning Eizenberg Architecture Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image

    The Hancock Lofts building incorporates market-rate condominiums, affordable rental studios, retail space, and extensive public parking.
    Photo: © Eric Staudenmaier Extra Large Image

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    Hancock Lofts floor plan drawings.
    Image: Koning Eizenberg Architecture Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image

    50 St. Peter Street is a residential adaptive reuse of historic jail buildings in Salem, Massachusetts.
    Photo: Neil Alexander Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image

    50 St. Peter Street ground-floor plan drawings before (below) and after (above) the conversion designed by Finegold Alexander + Associates.
    Image: Finegold Alexander + Associates Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image

    Elements of the jail, including metal bars, were preserved and reused in the interior of 50 St. Peter Street.
    Photo: Neil Alexander Extra Large Image

     

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