Page E1.4. 27 April 2011                     
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    AIA Top Green Buildings 2011

    continued

    Industrial Reuse

    After ten years of leasing space in a suburban office building, Livestrong — the Lance Armstrong Foundation — moved to a permanent home: an adapted 1950s warehouse in a culturally diverse, underserved urban neighborhood just east of downtown Austin, Texas.

    Lake/Flato Architects designed the LEED Gold-certified conversion of the concrete tilt-wall building to house offices, meeting rooms, an in-house gym, and a cancer-support program. More than 80 percent of the existing warehouse structure was kept intact, and demolished material was largely repurposed or recycled.

    The 30,000-square-foot (2,800-square-meter) "block" floor plate posed challenges for the project team as they sought to provide daylight and views. The warehouse was nearly devoid of windows or other openings, other than a large, two-bay truck loading dock facing the western sun. The building's zero-lot line relationship with the site's eastern boundary prevented the introduction of window openings and, in addition, the south facade adjoins the freight railroad right-of-way, also used as a commuter rail and bike thoroughfare.

    The designers responded by replacing the roof's center bays with north-facing clerestory windows, which transmit diffused daylight into the core workspace, virtually eliminating the need for artificial lighting during daytime hours. Facilitating the distribution of daylight is the open-plan office space shared by all staff, including the CEO. Salvaged roof decking was remilled to construct a variety of freestanding enclosures within the office interior, which help to direct traffic flow, define departments, and provide adaptable space for interactive work.

    An effective thermal envelope was established by adding insulation to the walls and the roof. Another feature contributing to energy efficiency is the ultra-high-efficiency variable-volume-refrigerant mini-split system, which provides a high degree of zonal control.

    The building is Gold-rated under LEED-NC v2.2, and has an estimated EUI of 11.3 kWh/ft2/year (122 kWh/m2/year).

    Sustainable Single- and Multifamily Dwellings

    The LEED Platinum-certified OS House in Racine, Wisconsin, by Johnsen Schmaling Architects, received a 2011 AIA Housing Award prior to being named to the 2011 AIA/COTE Top Ten list, and we covered this playful-while-structured Modernist dwelling in ArchitectureWeek No. 513.

    Two more projects on the 2011 Top Ten list — the Step Up on Fifth supportive housing project in Santa Monica, California, and the LEED Platinum-targeting Cherokee Lofts in Los Angeles — were both designed by Pugh + Scarpa Architects (now Brooks + Scarpa Architects), recipient of the 2010 AIA Architecture Firm Award.

    Announced by the AIA on April 14, 2011, the AIA/COTE Top Ten Green Projects for 2011 will be honored at the AIA National Convention and Design Exposition in New Orleans, Louisiana, May 12 to 14, 2011.

    The 2011 jury included Joshua W. Aidlin, AIA, Aidlin Darling Design; Mary Guzowski, School of Architecture, University of Minnesota; Kevin Kampschroer, Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings, General Services Administration; Mary Ann Lazarus, AIA, LEED AP, HOK; Jennifer Sanguinetti, P.E., LEED AP, Smart Buildings & Energy Management, BC Housing; and Lauren Yarmuth, LEED AP, YRG New York.

     

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    The new offices of Livestrong, the Lance Armstrong Foundation, occupy a converted former paper company warehouse in Austin, Texas.
    Photo: Hester + Hardaway Extra Large Image

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    Floor-plan drawing of the Livestrong building after its LEED Gold-certified conversion by Lake/Flato Architects.
    Image: Lake/Flato Architects Extra Large Image

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    To admit daylight into the Livestrong building, the roof over its central structural bay was replaced with a series of north-facing sawtooth clerestory windows.
    Photo: Hester + Hardaway Extra Large Image

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    Johnsen Schmaling Architects designed the OS House, a two-story, LEED Platinum-certified modern home on an infill lot in Racine, Wisconsin.
    Photo: John Macaulay Extra Large Image

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    The northeast balcony of the OS House overlooks Lake Michigan.
    Photo: John Macaulay Extra Large Image

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    The Cherokee Lofts building in Los Angeles, California, designed by Pugh + Scarpa Architects (now Brooks + Scarpa Architects), features a facade of operable perforated aluminum panels.
    Photo: Courtesy Brooks + Scarpa Architects Extra Large Image

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    Behind the operable panels on some upper floors of Cherokee Lofts is a narrow, shaded balcony area.
    Photo: Courtesy Brooks + Scarpa Architects Extra Large Image

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    Inside the living space of a residential unit at Cherokee Lofts, which is targeting LEED Platinum certification.
    Photo: Courtesy Brooks + Scarpa Architects Extra Large Image

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    Pugh + Scarpa also designed Step Up on Fifth, a supportive housing facility in downtown Santa Monica, California. Although the project incorporates many sustainable design features, LEED certification was not sought.
    Photo: John Edward Linden Extra Large Image

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    Step Up on Fifth's residential units are served by open-air stairways and corridors overlooking either of two central courtyards.
    Photo: John Edward Linden Extra Large Image

     

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