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    Design for Flooding

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    Components and dimensions of the Earth's atmosphere.
    Image: John Wiley & Sons Extra Large Image

     

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    Diagram of the global hydrologic cycle. Averaged over the globe, the amount of evaporation is equal to the amount of precipitation.
    Image: Wiley Extra Large Image

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    From 1958 to 2008, observed annual average precipitation in the United States increased about 5% on average, with significant regional variations toward wetter and drier conditions (map A), while observed very heavy precipitation events significantly increased in all U.S. regions (map B).
    Image: Wiley Extra Large Image

     

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    Diagram of global thermohaline circulation, a model of ocean current movement also known as the "great ocean conveyor belt." Image does not appear in book.
    Image: Wikipedia Extra Large Image

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    Global sea-level rise from 1880 to 2010. Image does not appear in book.
    Image: Wikipedia

     

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    Global maps depicting carbon storage (metric tons per hectare) in soils (top) and vegetation (bottom and thumbnail) Image does not appear in book.
    Image: World Resources Institute Extra Large Image

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    Section diagram showing FEMA coastal flood zones and likely flood levels for a "100-year" flood. Image does not appear in book.
    Image: FEMA Extra Large Image

     

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    For Coastal A Zones and V Zones, the minimum requirement is met when the bottom of the lowest structural member of a home is positioned at the 100-year wave crest height (Base Flood Elevation, or BFE). Some jurisdictional authorities may require additional distance between wave crest and structure. This additional height is called the Design Flood Elevation (DFE).Image does not appear in book.
    Image: FEMA Extra Large Image

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    Section diagram of a typical bioretention swale. Such swales are often used to mitigate runoff from impervious surfaces.
    Image: Wiley Extra Large Image

     

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    Possible failure modes for masonry piers. Image does not appear in book.
    Image: FEMA Extra Large Image

     

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