Page N3.3. 15 December 2010                     
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    Housing Awards from HUD and the AIA

    continued

    The Arbor Lofts project achieves substantial resource-efficiency. The design exceeds California's Title 24 energy code requirements by an estimated 20 percent, thanks to highly efficient mechanical systems and other measures, and low-flow plumbing fixtures reduce water use by about 20 percent.

    The city's historic core now hosts community events such as farmers markets and street fairs, a success to which the downtown plan and the lofts may have contributed.

    Renovating for Accessibility in Seattle

    Looking at the Madrona Live/Work project in Seattle, Washington, it's easy to focus on the charm of the early-1900s brick storefront or the plentiful daylight filling the interior. One might never realize that the renovated building was a successful example of universal design. Accessibility was indeed a design priority for client John Kucher, who uses a wheelchair.

    The 1,543-square-foot (143-square-meter) project, which combines a home for John and Tina Kucher with an office for John, was honored in the category of "housing accessibility," also known as the Alan J. Rothman Award. "This project transcends our preconceptions about accessible design and illustrates how Universal Design can be embodied in a design solution that is attractive and usable to a wide audience," lauded the jury.

    While the original commercial structure had previously been transformed into a home and office, the renovation by Tyler Engle Architects reconfigured much of the space.

    The main living and dining area features a single level of polished concrete for unrestricted wheelchair access, while the office at the rear of the site remains four steps higher — flush with the sidewalk, to satisfy John Kucher's desire to "commute to work" around the perimeter of the building. In the kitchen, a floating concrete countertop steps from low to high, accommodating the disparate height requirements of the clients.

    The aesthetic for the Madrona project is sophisticated, with a minimal yet richly textured palette of natural wood, concrete, glass, and white walls, forming a complementary setting for the couple's extensive art collection.

    Inspired by a shipping container, the home's wood-clad service core houses the flexible kitchen space and half-bathroom. Steel-plate blinders help to visually contain the kitchen space, and sliding pocket doors offer isolation from the front office and entry spaces, while the concealment of kitchen equipment, which pivots out for use, enhances the gallerylike atmosphere of the space as a whole. Over the living and dining room, a large skylight brings the subtly colorful light of the Pacific Northwest into the center of the space.

    The AIA announced the 2010 AIA/ HUD Secretary Awards on October 12, 2010.

    The jury for the 2010 AIA/HUD Secretary Awards included jury chair Andrew V. Porth, AIA, of Porth Architects, Inc. in Red Lodge, Montana, along with Natalye Appel, FAIA, of Natalye Appel + Associates Architects in Houston; Geoffrey Goldberg, AIA, of Chicago firm G. Goldberg and Associates; Grace Kim, AIA, of Seattle's Schemata Workshop; New York-based Jane Kolleeny of Architectural Record and GreenSource; and Luis F. Borray, Assoc. AIA, and Regina C. Gray, Ph.D., of the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development.

     

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    The four-story Paseo Senter at Coyote Creek complex is organized around public gathering spaces and parking structures, and includes a number of shared amenities at ground level.
    Photo: Steve Proehl Extra Large Image

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    One of the community spaces at Paseo Senter looks out on a small children's play area.
    Photo: Jeffrey Peters/ Vantage Point Photography Extra Large Image

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    PSL Architects designed the five-story Arbor Lofts, an affordable housing development in Lancaster, California, that targets artists as tenants.
    Photo: Panic Studio LA/ Courtesy PSL Architects Extra Large Image

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    The living/ kitchen space of the end unit at Arbor Lofts, located inside the building's cylindrical form.
    Photo: Panic Studio LA/ Courtesy PSL Architects Extra Large Image

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    Arbor Lofts floor-plan drawings.
    Image: PSL Architects Extra Large Image

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    An entry courtyard on the west side of the building separates Arbor Lofts from an adjacent structure.
    Photo: Panic Studio LA/ Courtesy PSL Architects Extra Large Image

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    A single-family home and office for John and Tina Kucher, housed in a converted early-1900s commercial building in Seattle, Washington, was recognized for accessible design.
    Photo: Benjamin Benschneider Extra Large Image

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    Exploded axonometric rendering of the Kucher Residence.
    Image: Tyler Engle Architects Extra Large Image

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    Floor plan drawings of the Kucher Residence before (bottom) and after (top) the renovation designed by Tyler Engle Architects.
    Image: Tyler Engle Architects Extra Large Image

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    The main living and dining space of the Kucher Residence, beneath a large, gabled skylight.
    Photo: Benjamin Benschneider Extra Large Image

     

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