Page C2.3 . 28 July 2010                     
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    How to Create a Park

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    Elms shade a lawn near the southeast corner of Central Park. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Ed Yourdon Extra Large Image

     

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    Designed by Calvert Vaux, the Dairy building (1870) in Central Park was located in an area originally called the "Children's District" by Olmsted. Today the building serves as one of three visitor centers. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Chris Reinhart/ Artifice Images Extra Large Image

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    Site plan drawing of Olmsted's design for Mount Royal Park (1877) in Montreal, Quebec.
    Image: Frederick Law Olmsted/ Courtesy National Park Service Extra Large Image

     

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    As completed, Mount Royal Park includes only some of the elements from Olmsted's original design. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Abdallah Hussein Extra Large Image

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    The park's Beaver Lake was created near the location Olmsted had planned for a small lake. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Flickr user montroyaler

     

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    Mount Royal Park surrounds the eponymous mountain, which rises 233 meters (71 feet). Elaborate staircases provide pedestrian access to some of the park's steeper areas. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Abdallah Hussein Extra Large Image

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    Site plan drawing of Olmsted and Vaux's design for Prospect Park (1867) in Brooklyn, New York.
    Image: Olmsted, Vaux & Co. / Courtesy National Park Service Extra Large Image

     

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    Prospect Park is a 585-acre (237-hectare) public park. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Kari Sullivan Extra Large Image

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    A classic stone archway accommodates crossing pedestrian paths at Prospect Park. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Matthew Rutledge Extra Large Image

     

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    Concert Grove at Prospect Park includes the cast-iron Oriental Pavilion, which originally served as a tea house. Image does not appear in book.
    Photo: Flickr user edenpictures Extra Large Image

     

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