Page C1.3 . 28 July 2010                     
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    How to Design a Park

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    ArchWeek Image
    SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

    In 1883, Frederick Law Olmsted purchased Fairsted, a circa-1810 farmhouse in Brookline, Massachusetts (shown here around 1900), in which he lived until 1898.
    Photo: Courtesy National Park Service Extra Large Image

     

    ArchWeek Image
    SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

    Olmsted covered Fairsted from foundation to roof line in vines and creepers. Plants still climb the facade, seen here in 1982.
    Photo: Historic American Buildings Survey/ Historic American Engineering Record (HABS/HAER) Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image
    SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

    A large west-facing drafting room is located on the ground floor of Fairsted.
    Photo: HABS/HAER Extra Large Image

     

    ArchWeek Image
    SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

    Fairsted and rear grounds as they were kept circa 1900.
    Photo: Courtesy National Park Service Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image

    Just north of the driveway, the site slopes steeply downward, forming a hollow.
    Photo: HABS/HAER Extra Large Image

     

    ArchWeek Image

    Fairsted site plan drawing.
    Image: HABS/HAER Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image
    SUBSCRIPTION SAMPLE

    The south facade of the main portion of Fairsted. A 1903 addition to the house is just visible behind the tree.
    Photo: HABS/HAER Extra Large Image

     

    ArchWeek Image

    Fairsted northwest-southeast section drawing looking southwest.
    Image: HABS/HAER Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image

    A Canadian hemlock occupies the center bed of the driveway loop at Fairsted.
    Photo: HABS/HAER Extra Large Image

     

    ArchWeek Image

    A spruce pole fence and archway mark the entrance to Fairsted.
    Photo: HABS/HAER Extra Large Image

     

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