Page B4.3. 08 November 2006                     
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  • To Cross the Seine

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    QUIZ

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    To Cross the Seine

    continued

    The central section of the structure was fabricated on the Rhine in Lauterbourg, where the welds could be laid out in comfortable working conditions. The lens was moved on two hydraulic suspension motorized bogies from the shop yard to a twin barge moored at the river quayside. It was later delivered by barge to the construction site.

    The designers chose from the outset to engineer a slender structure that would be susceptible to perceptible vibrations but controlled by dampers. They conducted extensive studies using modal and step-by-step methods to predict the acceleration from wind turbulence and pedestrian loads.

    However, the real structure inevitably differs from the design model due to local friction, play, and secondary continuity. After construction, the vibrations of the structure were measured and compared with the predictions. The confirmation of the frequencies of the modes permitted in turn the confirmation of the masses in the damping devices.

    As in any real structure, the vibrations are not the simple one-degree-of-freedom cases found in text books. Instead, they are a complex combination of vertical, lateral, and torsional vibrations. However simplified equivalent modal models proved useful for the tuning of the dampers.

    The use of contemporary material technology and construction methods continues the tradition of technical modernity of our firms and of Paris.

    Henry Bardsley is an engineer with RFR, Paris.

     
    Project Credits

    Owner: Direction de la Voirie et des Déplacements, City of Paris
    Architect: Feichtinger Architectes
    Engineers: RFR and Sepia
    Aerodynamics consultant: PSP, RWTH
    Structural steel constructor: Eiffel SA
    Foundation constructor: Soletanche Bachy

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    ArchWeek Image

    The footbridge "Passerelle Simone de Beauvoir," by RFR and Feichtinger Architectes, in construction.
    Photo: RFR

    ArchWeek Image

    The bridge end anchored into the quay.
    Photo: RFR

    ArchWeek Image

    Central truss being prefabricated off site.
    Photo: RFR

    ArchWeek Image

    Steel anchor being lifted into place.
    Photo: Eiffel

    ArchWeek Image

    Bridge ends constructed in situ.
    Photo: Eiffel

    ArchWeek Image

    Cross section through the foundation.
    Image: RFR Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image

    Anchorage diagram.
    Image: RFR Extra Large Image

    ArchWeek Image

    Undulating bridge.
    Photo: RFR

    ArchWeek Image

    Struts of the comb-like web structure.
    Photo: RFR

    ArchWeek Image

    Underside of the wood deck.
    Photo: RFR

     

    Click on thumbnail images
    to view full-size pictures.

     
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