Page N2.3. 01 February 2006                     
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  • AIA Awards to Predock, Thorncrown, Moore Ruble Yudell
     
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  • Chicago AIA Awards

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    Chicago AIA Awards

    continued

    Detailing and reinstalling the stone cladding on the redesigned road was particularly challenging. Said a juror: "It's important to recognize public architecture for investing in a project that will serve the city another 80 years at a time when public works aren't done with that kind of care and detail."

    Divinity Is in the Details

    "Divine detail" is the AIA Chicago's award category that honors architectural ingenuity in a firm's use of a particular material, detail, or building technology. Execution must express the idea as a whole. One of these awards went to the Crown Fountain, designed by Krueck & Sexton. An impressive combination of LED technology, water, and glass make this one of the most popular and photographed destinations in Chicago.

    The structure's envelope consists of glass bricks supported by a frame of thin, stainless T-steel bars welded into eggcrate panels. Hand-cast glass bricks were siliconed into the frame. A small lip cast at the face of each brick both minimizes the face joint dimension and makes the steel frame seem to disappear. The frame bears all structural loads, relieving the glass bricks of any stress and allowing for easy brick replacement. "It's completely innovative," enthused a juror.

    A divine detail honor award went to the Racine (Wisconsin) Art Museum, by architect Brininstool + Lynch Ltd., for its cladding system. While the museum appears new, it is actually a repurposing of several existing adjacent buildings. To unify the hodgepodge of limestone, masonry, and concrete facades on a tight budget, the architects covered the ensemble with a new skin.

    The skin is a double-wall acrylic panel in four-foot (1.2-meter) widths, with alternating lengths up to 34 feet (10.4 meters). A custom aluminum truss and hardware system holds the panels 18 inches (46 centimeters) from the wall. During the day, the museum resembles a box wrapped with iridescent panels. At night, the panels are backlit, making the facility appear radiant. Jurors were impressed by the clever, economical method for merging several buildings into one.

    Another award-winning facade detail was in the renovation of the Gladstone Factory in Schaumburg, Illinois by Andrew Metter, FAIA, Annex 5. The architect designed a "kit" to be clipped onto the existing facade of the 1970s-era industrial park building. The new facade, inspired by the old curtain wall facades of adjacent 1930s industrial structures, has been layered with glass and aluminum louvers.

    This approach explored the nature of the "kit" solution as a prototype for altering America's often bleak industrial park landscape. "It has a Mondrian-like composition," one juror said. "It keeps your eyes busy so you don't look at the big, ugly building behind it."

    Interior Architecture Awards

    One of three honor awards for interiors went to the 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter) corporate real estate brokerage office of Julien J. Studley Inc. in Chicago, designed by VOA Associates Incorporated. To give the client an "international image" and to incorporate existing artwork, the architects produced interlocking cubes and architectural "boxes" to create spaces within spaces.

    Lighting was placed in unexpected, concealed areas so the architecture appears to glow. One juror described the result as a "large space nicely punctuated with light and color to define the choreography of space."

    Another interior award went to the new U.S. Federal Building in Oklahoma City, a building perhaps best known for its massive bomb-resistant exterior. Architecture firm Ross Barney + Jankowski Inc. sought to make the new facility a symbol of freedom. Because security was paramount, building mass, glazing inside the courtyard, and bollards were constructed to maintain a sense of safety.

    The design also maximizes sustainability and workplace productivity. It incorporates daylighting, indirect lighting, individually controlled task lighting, and underfoot air supply for efficient distribution and individual comfort control. AIA Chicago award jurors were impressed with how architecture and structure were combined to create a feeling of security.

    A 100-year-old coach house in Chicago demonstrated exemplary interiors in the way it was converted by John Ronan Architect into a supplemental living space for a family of five. The existing structure, which once housed horses and coachmen, was stripped down to bare masonry to reveal its history. It is now the sum of two parallel systems: a vintage shell and new interior construction, which was inserted into the shell like furniture.

    By virtue of the adjustable millwork, the space can alternate between different uses: playroom, media room, conference room, guesthouse. Hidden behind the birch panels are kitchen appliances, a fold-out bed, media tools, and children's toys. Jurors admired the minimal, methodical construction. "It's a flexible space, it can be occupied in different ways," a juror commented. "It's like a Chinese puzzle in a way. There's a nice restraint and simplicity."

    Numerous additional projects received citations of merit and special recognition from the AIA Chicago.

    The awards jury included: Steve L. Dumez, AIA, Eskew + Dumez + Ripple; Frank Harmon, FAIA, Frank Harmon Architect; Joan M Soranno, AIA, HGA; Randy Brown AIA, Randy Brown Architects; Roberta W. Jorgensen, FAIA, Jorgensen Architects; Mark McInturff, FAIA, McInturff Architects; Steven Burns, AIA, Burns + Beyerl; Dirk Danker, AIA, Nagle Hartray Danker Kagan McKay Penney; Holly Gerberding, AIA, Department of General Services, Architecture, Engineering, and Construction Management.

     

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    One of the AIA Chicago honor awards for "divine detail" went to the Racine Art Museum, by architect Brininstool + Lynch Ltd., for a cladding system that unifies several dissimilar existing buildings.
    Photo: Christopher Barrett/ Hedrich Blessing

    ArchWeek Image

    The Racine Art Museum.
    Photo: Christopher Barrett/ Hedrich Blessing

    ArchWeek Image

    Renovated Gladstone Factory by Andrew Metter, FAIA, Annex 5.
    Photo: Barbara Karant, Karant & Associates

    ArchWeek Image

    Gladstone Factory facade detail.
    Photo: Barbara Karant, Karant & Associates

    ArchWeek Image

    One of three honor awards for interiors went to the Chicago office of Julien J. Studley Inc., designed by VOA Associates Incorporated.
    Photo: Nick Merrick/ Hedrich Blessing

    ArchWeek Image

    Julien J. Studley office interiors.
    Photo: Nick Merrick/ Hedrich Blessing

    ArchWeek Image

    An interior award went to the new U.S. Federal Building in Oklahoma City by Ross Barney + Jankowski Inc.
    Photo: Steve Hall/ Hedrich Blessing

    ArchWeek Image

    Inside the daylit yet secure-feeling U.S. Federal Building in Oklahoma City.
    Photo: Steve Hall/ Hedrich Blessing

    ArchWeek Image

    Adjustable millwork brought an interiors honor award to a converted coach house, designed by John Ronan Architect.
    Photo: Nathan Kirkman, Nathan Kirkman Photography

    ArchWeek Image

    The 100-year-old coach house.
    Photo: Nathan Kirkman, Nathan Kirkman Photography

     

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