Page N1.3 . 10 November 2004                     
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    Designing for Massive Change

    continued

     

    ArchWeek Image

    Health and living area of the Massive Change exhibition in the Vancouver Art Gallery.
    Photo: Tim Bonham/Vancouver Art/Bruce Mau Design

     

    ArchWeek Image

    Interface area of the exhibition.
    Photo: Tim Bonham/Vancouver Art/Bruce Mau Design

    ArchWeek Image

    The Materials Gallery showcases innovations in materials science.
    Photo: Tim Bonham/Vancouver Art/Bruce Mau Design

     

    ArchWeek Image

    Materials Gallery, design model image.
    Photo: Bruce Mau Design/Vancouver Art Gallery, Copyright: Maris Mezulis

    ArchWeek Image

    The Manufacturing Gallery shows examples of innovative and radically sustainable manufacturing processes and products.
    Photo: Tim Bonham/Vancouver Art/Bruce Mau Design

     

    ArchWeek Image

    Exhibition design model of the Manufacturing Gallery.
    Photo: Bruce Mau Design/Vancouver Art Gallery, Copyright: Maris Mezulis

    ArchWeek Image

    Aerogel, displayed in the materials Gallery, is the lightest solid in the world, consisting of 99.8% air.
    Photo: NASA/JPL/Caltech.

     

    ArchWeek Image

    The Tree of Life project traces back relationships among all living species through an analysis of common genes. This diagram depicts the relationships among about 3,000 species of bacteria, plants, fungi, and animals.
    Photo: David M. Hillis and Derrick Zwickl, University of Texas at Austin

    ArchWeek Image

    Japan’s Earth Simulator, shown in the Global Portraits Gallery, creates simulations that predict global change of the atmosphere, ocean and continents.

     

    ArchWeek Image

    The Aerospace Corporation’s Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) tracks the space “debris” objects that orbit the globe.
    Copyright: JAMSTEC/Earth Simulator Center

     

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