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    THE CRAFT OF PRECAST CONCRETE

    Precast concrete is an architectural material unique in its combination of strength and versatility. In the hands of an imaginative designer and an expert fabricator, precast concrete can assume a rich variety of forms, textures, and colors, while performing an array of structural roles. Next week we'll look at a few projects recently selected for excellence awards from the Architectural Precast Association.

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    AMERICAN LIBRARIES AWARDED FOR EXCELLENCE

    The American Library Association and the American Institute of Architects have selected the recipients of the 2003 AIA/ALA Library Building Awards. One winner was the Seattle Public Temporary Central Library, in Seattle, by LMN Architects (photo by Fred Housel). The architects used tropical colors in contrast with exposed structure and mechanical systems, reinforcing a "camping metaphor" for the temporary facility. Next week we'll take a look at a few other exemplary libraries.

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    SWEDEN THROUGH THE CENTURIES

    The history of architecture in Sweden is one of "functionalistic eclecticism," with traditions borrowed from other cultures, molded by national politics, and blended into a uniquely Swedish form. Shown here is the House of Nobles, in Stockholm, dating from the 1640s. Next week, Olof Kallstenius will take us on a brief tour of Swedish architecture and explain some of its influences from the 17th century to the 20th.

     
     
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