Page D2.2 . 28 November 2001                     
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    Singapore Architecture Awards

    continued

    A Home of Serenity

    In a suburb of Singapore, in an area of predominantly semidetached houses, SCDA Architects designed a simple, expressive house for a client who wanted "a place of serenity, free from disorder and pretensions."

    Sitting on a tight lot, the design features a two-story volume, constructed entirely of steel and wood, elevated on a largely transparent ground level that opens to a landscaped forecourt.

    The house's facade is designed to have a "double skin." Fixed wood-lattice louvers, triangular in section, permit views out while preserving privacy. A layer of glazing features operable panels, enabling either air-conditioning or natural ventilation.

    A trellised skylight brings light through the center of the house to a granite reflective pool on the ground floor. This central, multistory void separates distinct living spaces for the two owners, a mother and son. A slender steel and timber bridge connects the two halves of the program across the void.

    A Prefabricated Palette

    Located within the conservation district of Singapore's Chinatown, a new, mixed-use project by Look Architects sits comfortably in its context. In terms of scale, texture, and character, the building complements its historic neighbors, yet it is a distinctly contemporary adaptation of the "shop/house" typology.

    Its structural system consists of a new party wall, peripheral columns, and flat slab construction. The building is almost entirely constructed with prefabricated parts.

    The facade is a fresco of 19 pieces of precast concrete panels in varying shapes and proportions. Instead of the repetitive rhythm common to this method of construction, the panels create a tectonic expression of groove lines and nonrepetitive fenestration. These are composed to give scale to the building volume, while coordinating with the design of a sensuous interior space.

    The "master-mold" method was used as an economical process to create these pieces. New methods of color treatment by pigmentation, as well as the staining of the concrete panels, ensure better quality and weathering properties in the final color finish.

    School as Streetscape

    The Rosyth School is a "mega" primary school, about 20 percent larger than a standard Singapore primary school. The architects, PWD Consultants, responded to the additional space requirement with a bright, midrise building that breaks new ground in offering an alternative to Singapore's typical four-story primary school buildings.

    Scale is critical to the school's circulation and spatial organization, as well as to the children's ability to relate to it as a place. A central "Main Street," a gathering place for students, forms a connecting spine between four quadrants of activity zones. The location of common facilities within a midlevel band minimizes vertical circulation.

    Designed as a setting for spontaneity and discovery, the experience of moving through the school is carefully orchestrated. Along the broad flights of Main Street, balconies overlooking the atrium space, framed views, landscaped terraces, and sky gardens create variations and interaction spaces similar to those of a real streetscape. The strategic use of bright colors aids orientation and gives a cheery feel to the school.

    Two Approaches to Sport

    A pair of dramatically divergent clubhouses share the honors in the recreational building category. The Singapore Cricket Association's new pavilion by Kerry Hill Architects is a sleek example of   >>>

     

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    ArchWeek Image

    The facade of the award-winning mixed-use development by Look Architects is a fresco of 19 pieces of precast concrete panels.
    Photo: Tim Nolan

    ArchWeek Image

    The mixed-use development by Look Architects is almost entirely constructed with prefabricated parts.
    Photo: Tim Nolan

    ArchWeek Image

    Circulation routes at Rosyth School, by PWD Consultants, are intended to resemble a streetscape.
    Photo: Albert Lim K.S.

    ArchWeek Image

    Designed as a setting for spontaneity and discovery, the experience of moving through the Rosyth School is carefully orchestrated.
    Photo: Albert Lim K.S.

    ArchWeek Image

    The Singapore Cricket Association's new pavilion by Kerry Hill Architects.
    Photo: Albert Lim K.S.

    ArchWeek Image

    Singapore Yacht Club, by Alfred Wong Partnership.
    Photo: Albert Lam

    ArchWeek Image

    The House of Tan Yeok Nee was restored by RSP Architects, Planners and Engineers.
    Photo: Liang Qing Ping/University of Chicago Graduate School of Business & Winpeak Investment.

    ArchWeek Image

    The restored homestead is now home to the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business.
    Photo: Liang Qing Ping/University of Chicago Graduate School of Business & Winpeak Investment.

     

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