Page E1 . 24 October 2001       
ArchitectureWeek - Environment Department
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ENVIRONMENT
 
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  • Playful PV in Rome
     
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  • Amsterdam Gasworks Reborn
     
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    ENVIRONMENT THIS WEEK

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    PLAYFUL PV IN ROME

    At the Children's Museum of Rome, a partly see-through photovoltaic (PV) roof brings new levels of meaning to everyday childhood experience of playing in the sun.

    One of the museum's central mandates is to heighten awareness of the quality of urban life through "a transparent guided itinerary" of everyday activities. Its new photovoltaic roof, designed by Abbate e Vigevano Architetti, gives form to this mandate.

    Continue...

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    AMSTERDAM GASWORKS REBORN

    In recent years there has been a growing concern about "brownfield" projects. As these abandoned industrial sites are converted back into productive use, governments and local communities must often work together to mitigate the polluted environment and revitalize the surrounding neighborhoods.

    In many brownfield projects the property is sold as real estate to be redeveloped. Buildings are torn down and a whole new development constructed, leaving no trace of the site's past.

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    RECYCLING CONSTRUCTION DEBRIS

    With $100 billion in new construction each year in the United States, and $126 billion in renovations, the recovery of materials from construction and demolition (C&D) has important economic and environmental implications.

    To the extent that the debris from construction and demolition can be reused or recycled rather than thrown away, demand for virgin resources is reduced, the embedded energy in these materials is recaptured, and the need for increasingly limited landfill space is reduced.

    Continue...

    More Environment

    Japan To Help China Build Ecological Database — Daily Yomimuri, 2001.1024

    New ASC gets Star Building Award — Dunn Connection, 2001.1023

    Northwest Conservation Roller Coaster a Common Theme at Conference — Con.WEB, 2001.1023

    Rules to save nature of Red Rock — Las Vegas Sun, 2001.1018

    Making The Business Case For Going Green — Chrsitian Science Monitor, 2001.1018

    Alliance Seeks Federal Policies For Distributed Energy Systems — EDC, 2001.10 Edition

    Breaking the Sustainable Product Barrier — EDC, 2001.10 Edition

    Federal Agencies Install Thousands of Solar Water Heaters in Hawaii — State of Hawaii Press Release, 2001.0906

    Regulating Runoff — ENR, 2001.1015

    Pygmy-Owl Decision Means FWS Must Provide Costs Of Land Use Restrictions — NAHB, 2001.1015

    We Don't Have To Kyoto The Line To Be Green — The Australian, 2001.1012

    High Expectations — EDC, 2001.10 Edition

    Wall to Wall Sustainability — EDC, 2001.10 Edition

    Maintaining a Green Commitment — EDC, 2001.10 Edition

    Mendler, Ford Win IIDA and C&A Sustainable Design Leadership Award — EDC, 2001.09 Edition

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