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    THE UNITED KINGDOM'S GARDEN OF EDEN

    Swirling mists spiral upward from a giant crater deep within the earth. Slowly, through the haze, emerges a city, no ordinary conurbation but an epicenter under giant geometric domes on a lunar landscape. This is not life as we know it, this is the future. Welcome to the Eden Project. Next week join ArchitectureWeek contributing editor Don Barker when he shows us around this 21st century Garden of Eden in the southwest of the United Kingdom. The garden will "arouse the senses, encouraging the erstwhile stagnant subconscious to run riot."

    ArchWeek Photo

    CLEANING UP OUR ACT AND OUR INDUSTRIAL BACK YARDS

    A war has been declared on "brownfields," those abandoned, idled or under-used industrial and commercial facilities where redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination. These sites are located in just about every community throughout the United States. For many years, nothing was done about sites out of concern for cost, safety, and liability. Nevertheless, communities in the U.S. and abroad have realized that responsible brownfield redevelopment can transform environmentally impaired property into productive community assets. Next week ArchitectureWeek contributing editor Lili Eylon will show us some success stories.

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    NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS SPOTLIGHTED FOR PRESERVATION

    In May, the National Trust for Historic Preservation celebrated Preservation Week by announcing the winners of its first-ever poster contest. The winning posters were chosen by their ability to evoke the enduring public values and unique contributions of the people who learn, teach, and play in historic neighborhood schools. Next week we'll look at some of these posters and the unique buildings they represent and explain why neighborhood schools have become such a valued but endangered resource in American communities.

     
     
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