Page D1.2 . 08 November 2000                     
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  • In out of the rain at PDX
     
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  • MOSSticism in the Hayden Tract
     
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  • Detailing the Not So Big House

     
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    QUIZ

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    In out of the rain at PDX

    (continued)

    The design for the bridges evolved from a linear to an S-shaped form in order to align the two existing structural cores where the elevator, stairs, and escalators are located. Changing the shape of the bridges made the physical connections more passenger-friendly and created a dynamic element within the large space.

    Fixed attachments anchor the canopy and skybridges to the parking garage, while flexible joints at the terminal building columns and bridge connections allow the structure to expand and contract with temperature changes. This design also accommodates structural movement during a potential seismic event.

    PDX has been one of the fastest growing airports in the United States. In order to accommodate such growth, the airport launched PDX 2000, a three-phase development program. This first phase improves access and increases close-in parking by enlarging and expanding the parking garage. The original three-story parking garage has expanded to seven levels, more than tripling in capacity.

    Inside the terminal, the main building's east wall moved 25 feet further east, enlarging the ticket-lobby and baggage-claim areas. In addition, new elevators, escalators, and stairs were built east of their previous locations to improve circulation.

    The goal of the program is to meet the demands of greater traffic while maintaining the superior facilities and service. The design solution illustrates how wayfinding can be improved at existing terminals.

     
    Project Credits

    Client: Port of Portland
    Architect: Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership

    ZGF Design Team: Robert Packard, III, Associate AIA, Principal-in-Charge
    Robert Frasca, FAIA, Design Partner
    Kelly Davis, AIA, Project Manager
    Larry Bruton, AIA, Technical Designer
    John Thompson, AIA, Senior Designer
    Robert Zimmerman, AIA, Project Architect Consultants: Fletcher Farr Ayotte, Architectural Subconsultant
    Howard Needles Tammen & Bergendoff, Terminal Planning
    KPFF Consulting Engineers, Structural Engineers PAE Consulting Engineers, Mechanical/Electrical Engineers
    Geotechnical Resources, Inc., Geotechnical Engineers
    Mayer/Reed, Landscape Architects
    Lerch, Bates & Associates, Inc., Elevator and Moving Walkway Designers
    Deborah Nichols Design, Signage Designers
    Rolf Jensen & Associates, Inc., Fire/Life Safety Engineers
    Michael R. Yantis Associates, Inc., Acoustical Engineers
    Cermak Peterka Petersen Inc., Wind Tunnel Testing Engineers
    Fisher Marantz Renfro Stone, Architectural Lighting Designers

    General Contractors: Baugh Construction Oregon, Inc.
    Hoffman Construction Company

    AW

    ArchWeek Photo

    The pedestrian bridges at PDX curve around to improve circulation.
    Photo: Timothy Hursley

    ArchWeek Photo

    Ten arching triangular "delta" trusses support the 220-foot span.
    Photo: Eckert & Eckert

    ArchWeek Photo

    The pedestrian bridges offer easy access from parking garage to terminal building.
    Photo: Timothy Hursley

    ArchWeek Photo

    The pedestrian bridges are suspended from the large canopy trusses.
    Photo: Timothy Hursley

    ArchWeek Photo

    The traveler drop off area is protected from the elements.
    Photo: Eckert & Eckert

    ArchWeek Photo

    Looking back from the airport exit road.
    Photo: Eckert & Eckert

     

    Click on thumbnail images
    to view full-size pictures.

     
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