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    CREATING THE NOT SO BIG HOUSE

    In July, ArchitectureWeek explored the concept of a "Not So Big House" propounded by architect Sarah Susanka. Now in a new book she explains the underlying design principles in language accessible to both homeowners and architects. A Not So Big House, she says, is different from a typical house in that all the special details come from the design of the third dimension—from how openings are framed to how themes are carried throughout the house. Next week, Susanka will explain three of these spatial concepts so that readers can apply them in their own houses.

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    PRESERVATION VS. DEMOLITION IN JERUSALEM

    In Jerusalem, as in many old cities around the world, there is a constant need to balance the historic with the modern. Tens of civilizations have left their mark in Jerusalem during its 4000-year-old history. The inhabitants, after centuries of living within the city walls, began in the second half of the 19th century to move outside the walls, and as the population grew, so did new building projects. In the process, before the value of cultural heritage became fully appreciated, many ancient structures were destroyed. Lili Eylon will look into the questions historic cities face today: what to preserve, what to restore, and what to demolish?

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    HIGH-TECH WINDOWS OFFER NEW ENERGY SAVINGS

    A window is arguably the most complex component in a building. It gives us light, views, fresh air, and the sun's warmth. Sometimes it can give us too much of a good thing. Too much direct sunlight can cause glare or increase the cooling load. Here now to help cope with this complexity is the so-called "smart window," which changes its light transmission characteristics depending on exterior conditions. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been testing electrochromic windows. They conclude that these glazings promise to be the next major advance in energy-efficient windows, changing windows from an energy liability to an energy source for the nation's building stock.

     
     
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