Page D2.1 . 05 July 2000                     
ArchitectureWeek - Design Department
NEWS   |   DESIGN   |   BUILDING   |   DESIGN TOOLS   |   BUILDING CULTURE
DESIGN
 
  •  
  • Industrial Facility Turns to the Arts
     
  •  
  • A Modern House Steeped in Mexican Tradition
     
  •  
  • Morphosis Diamond in the Rough
     
  •  
  • Ritzy Preservation Saves Philadelphia Landmark

     
    AND MORE
      Current Contents
      Blog Center
      Download Center
      New Products
      Products Guide
      Classic Home
      Architecture Forum
      Architects Directory
      Topics Library
      Complete Archive
      Web Directory
      About ArchWeek
      Search
      Subscribe & Contribute
      Free Newsletters
       

     
    QUIZ

    [an error occurred while processing this directive]

    Morphosis Diamond in the Rough

    by Alice Y. Kimm, AIA

    If buildings really do reflect society's values, we can applaud the new Diamond Ranch High School in Diamond Bar, California. Here is a place where social conscience coexists comfortably with creativity and imagination. These qualities are all permanently inscribed in the landscape of the campus and its form.

    Morphosis principal Thom Mayne, project architect John Enright, and executive architect Thomas Blurock Architects, have given us a rare example of architecture that not only inspires but educates. As it reflects both the client's and architects' belief in our children's futures, the project differs radically from other public schools' use of shoddy trailers masquerading as classrooms.

    Overlooking a typical Southern California tableau of freeways and sprawl, the 72-acre hillside campus is laid out in cascading terraces. The hillside had been believed impractical, if not impossible, to build on. Two years of grading preceded building construction. At the top of the hill are football fields; at the bottom, soccer fields and tennis courts. Sandwiched in between are two lines of buildings with a pedestrian street running down the middle.

    The simplicity of this parti is deceptive when examining the manner in which the two rows of buildings interact across the dividing street. The rows are divided into clusters, each of which has its own set of classrooms separated according to discipline, as well as its own courtyard.

    Students, faculty, and administration can move freely between clusters. The crisscrossing has the effect of splitting the building lines into smaller fragments, perhaps more reminiscent of Morphosis' early project organizations. The breaking up of the linear mass into functional units also has the effect of creating various types and sizes of communal spaces.

     

    Continue...

    ArchWeek Photo

    The detailing at the schools is simple and functional.
    Photo: John Enright

    ArchWeek Photo

    At the Diamond Ranch High School, clusters of roof forms seem to lean across the pedestrian spine towards each other.
    Photo: Brandon Welling

     
    < Prev Page Next Page > Send this to a friend       Subscribe       Contribute       Advertise       Privacy       Comments
    GREAT BUILDINGS   |   DISCUSSION   |   SCRAPBOOK   |   COMMUNITY   |   BOOKS   |   FREE 3D   |   ARTIFICE   |   SEARCH
      ArchitectureWeek.com © 2000 Artifice, Inc. - All Rights Reserved